confession

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confession

[kənfesh′ən]
an act of seeking expiation through another from guilt for a real or imagined transgression.

confession,

n in spiritual and psy-chological practice, a process of acknowledging, repenting, and seeking forgiveness for mistakes.

Patient discussion about confession

Q. How can I confess to my girlfriend that I am bipolar? Not that it really matters, since I cannot attract a woman to save my life, but I was wondering if there is ever a good time to say, "Hey, I am bipolar" and anticipate the reaction. As a bipolar man who is looking for some love and sex, how should I handle the topic, if at all?

A. Thanks JennJ. I think you're right about the group mentality. Thanks.

More discussions about confession
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References in classic literature ?
Emil Gluck's confession, six years later, cleared the unfortunate policeman of disgrace, and he is alive to-day and in good health, the recipient of a handsome pension from the city.
I can sigh over my mournful confession with the tenderest woman who reads it and pities me.
Instead of arguments for confession, he could now feel the presence of nothing but its evil consequences: the old dread of disgrace came back--the old shrinking from the thought of raising a hopeless barrier between himself and Nancy-- the old disposition to rely on chances which might be favourable to him, and save him from betrayal.
Loosen the Jewish doctor," said he to the hangman, "and string up the tailor instead, since he has made confession of his crime.
amiable Possessor of HER Heart whose hand is destined to another, why do you thus delay a confession of your attachment to the amiable Object of it?
My lord," said the father, "you are not so ill as to make a general confession urgent -- and it will be very fatiguing -- take care.
A woman would have understood that I shrank from a public confession of my shameful past life.
I may not have strength enough, in the case supposed, to betray you by making a complete confession with my own lips; but I can employ my last breath to speak the half-dozen words which will tell the doctor where he is to look.
I cannot describe the sensation that came upon me: I had not seen it since it unbosomed itself four years before, and now I felt like one to whom a friend has made some sorrowing confession of crime long past, and who has basely deserted him in consequence.
A little less than a hundred years ago, and a little more than six hundred years after the death, the confession of Pervaise was discovered in the secret archives of the Vatican.
The confession (as you call it) which you make in your pretty note, is the very thing that Sir Patrick spoke to me about in the dining-room before I went away.
Can there be any plainer confession that she is Mercy Merrick than the confession she has made?