potassium permanganate

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potassium

 (K) [po-tas´e-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 19, atomic weight 39.102. (See Appendix 6.) In combination with other minerals in the body, potassium forms alkaline salts that are important in body processes and play an essential role in maintenance of the acid-base and water balance in the body. All body cells, especially muscle tissue, require a high content of potassium. A proper balance between sodium, calcium, and potassium in the blood plasma is necessary for proper cardiac function.

Since most foods contain a good supply of potassium, potassium deficiency (hypokalemia) is unlikely to be caused by an unbalanced diet. Possible causes include cushing's syndrome (due to an adrenal gland disorder) and fanconi's syndrome (the result of a congenital kidney defect). The cause could also be an excessive dose of cortisone, prolonged vomiting or diarrhea, or thiazide diuretics, which are administered for treatment of hypertension. Signs of potassium deficiency can include weakness and lethargy, rapid pulse, nausea, diarrhea, and tingling sensations.

If the body absorbs enough potassium but the element is not distributed properly, various disorders may develop. Thus an abnormally low content of potassium in the blood may result in an intermittent temporary paralysis of the muscles, known as familial periodic paralysis.

Potassium deficiency can be treated by administration of potassium supplements. There is a large variety of these preparations. Some are liquids, some are powders to be dissolved in liquids, and some are slow-release tablets that dissolve in the intestine. All can cause gastrointestinal irritation. For many persons on diuretic therapy for hypertension, potassium deficiency can be avoided by increasing their consumption of potassium-containing foods, such as bananas, dates, prunes, and raisins, and potassium supplements are not needed. Potassium supplements are never given to patients receiving potassium-sparing diuretics such as amiloride, spironolactone, or triamterene. If the difficulty lies in the body's use of potassium, treatment is concerned with the primary cause of the deficiency.
Homeostatic balance of potassium. Through the functions of resorption and excretion, the kidneys are the best regulator of potassium balance in the extracellular fluids. From Malarkey and McMorrow, 2000.
potassium acetate an electrolyte replenisher and systemic and urinary alkalizer.
potassium bicarbonate an electrolyte replenisher, antacid, and urinary alkalizer.
potassium bitartrate a compound administered rectally as a suppository with sodium bicarbonate to produce carbon dioxide, which promotes defecation by distending the rectal ampulla; administered for relief of constipation, and evacuation of the colon before surgical or diagnostic procedures or childbirth.
potassium chloride a compound used orally or intravenously as an electrolyte replenisher.
potassium citrate a systemic and urinary alkalizer, electrolyte replenisher, and diuretic.
dibasic potassium phosphate the dipotassium salt, K2HPO4; used alone or in combination with other phosphate compounds as an electrolyte replenisher.
potassium gluconate an electrolyte replenisher used in the prophylaxis and treatment of hypokalemia.
potassium guaiacolsulfonate an expectorant.
potassium iodide an expectorant, antithyroid agent, and antifungal.
monobasic potassium phosphate the monopotassium salt, KH2PO4; used as a buffering agent in pharmaceutical preparations and, alone or in combination with other phosphate compounds, as an electrolyte replenisher and urinary acidifier and for prevention of kidney stones.
potassium permanganate a topical antiinfective and oxidizing agent, and an antidote for many poisons.
potassium phosphate a compound combining potassium and phosphoric acid, usually dibasic potassium phosphate.
potassium sodium tartrate a compound used as a saline cathartic.

po·tas·si·um per·man·ga·nate

a strong oxidizing agent used in solution as an antiseptic and deodorizing application for malodorous lesions, and formerly as a gastric lavage in poisoning from morphine, strychnine, aconite, and picrotoxin; in electron microscopy, it stains cytomembranes well and gives results similar to lead hydroxide staining; also used as a fixative (Luft).

po·tas·si·um per·man·ga·nate

(pŏ-taśē-ŭm pĕr-mangă-nāt)
Strong oxidizing agent used in solution as an antiseptic and deodorizing application for malodorous lesions; also used as a fixative.

potassium permanganate

A soluble compound that gives a skin-staining, deep purple solution with antiseptic and astringent properties. Now little used.
potassium permanganate; KMnO4; Permitabs; Condy's fluid topical astringent, deodorant and mildly antiseptic oxidizing agent, used as weak (1:10 000) solution (see foot baths; weever fish; Table 1) to treat hyperhidrosis
Table 1: Topical agents with astringent/anhidrotic action
AgentFormulation
AlcoholIMS; 70% isopropyl alcohol; spirituous lotions, e.g. 3% salicylic acid in IMS; surgical spirit; evaporates to cool skin and reduce maceration
Formalin10% solution causes a toughening effect on epidermis (may cause hypersensitivity)
AgNO320-25% solution (higher strengths can be used as NaCl in sweat mitigates the action of AgNO3)
Tannic acidAs dusting powder, or as borotannic complex giving an antifungal action
HamamelisWitch hazel: cooling effect
CalamineLotion or cream with a mild astringent and absorbent action; it will take up 1.5 times its own weight of water
Salicylic acid 3%Astringent and antiseptic as a lotion or dusting powder
Burow's solutionAluminium acetate ∼5% solution; diluted 1:3 in water to reduce sweat flow
TalcAntipruritic and absorbent; used as a base for dusting powders and to lubricate the skin
Dusting powdersAstringent medicament (e.g. tannic acid, salicylic acid), or antifungal medicament (e.g. boric acid, undecenoic acid) and lubricating applications in a talc, kaolin and/or zinc oxide base
OthersAgents that coincidentally show astringent/anhidrotic action include potassium permanganate, sodium polymetaphosphate, ferric chloride and compound tincture of benzoin

Note: Astringents act variously to cause protein precipitation (and thereby reduce epidermal maceration), cooling of tissues, constriction of sweat ducts and skin lubrication); anhidrotics act variously as cooling agents, astringents, and to alter epidermal reaction to retained sweat (e.g. reduce friction at the skin surface).

Both are used to control hyperhidrosis and bromidrosis by preventing the accumulation of sweat, increasing the skin's reaction to the action of sweat, and to compensate for any loss of resistance to infection at the skin surface.

IMS, industrial methylated spirit.

potassium

a chemical element, atomic number 19, atomic weight 39.102, symbol K. See Table 6. In combination with other minerals, potassium forms alkaline salts that are important in body processes and play an essential role in maintenance of its acid-base and water balance. All body cells, especially muscle tissue, require a high content of potassium. A proper balance between sodium, calcium and potassium in the blood plasma is necessary for proper cardiac function. Alfalfa meal, molasses and soyabean meal are good sources for herbivores.

potassium acetate, bicarbonate, bitartrate, citrate, gluconate
electrolyte replenishers, weak diuretics and urinary alkalinizers. Some are also used as expectorants.
potassium arsenite
potassium bromide
used in the treatment of seizures in humans and dogs.
potassium carbonate
used commercially as a fertilizer.
potassium channel
see channel.
potassium chloride
a compound used orally or intravenously as an electrolyte replenisher.
potassium cyanide
may be present in industrial effluents. A potent cause of cyanide poisoning.
potassium deficiency
nutritional deficiency of potassium is very rare. In calves can cause poor growth, anemia and diarrhea. Experimental deficiency in piglets causes also incoordination and cardiac insufficiency.
potassium exchange resins
an oral preparation administered to limit the amount of potassium available for absorption; used in the management of hyperkalemia. See also ion-exchange resin; sodium polystyrene sulfonate.
potassium guaiacolsulfonate
an expectorant.
potassium hydroxide (syn. potassium hydrate)
used commercially as a caustic. In veterinary medicine used mostly for clearing skin scrapings in the diagnosis of ectoparasite infestation.
potassium iodate
used as a constituent of salt blocks and mixes to supplement the diet with iodine. Overdosing will cause iodism.
potassium iodide
an expectorant and antithyroid agent.
potassium nitrate
used commercially as a fertilizer and a meat preservative. Can cause nitrate poisoning or nitrite poisoning in ruminants.
potassium nitrite
a compound sometimes used in place of potassium nitrate. Overdosing causes methemoglobin formation and severe, sometimes fatal hypoxia.
potassium nutritional deficiency
causes poor growth, anemia and diarrhea in pigs and calves. Electrocardiographic changes are also recorded. See also hypokalemia.
potassium oxalate
causes oxalate poisoning.
potassium permanganate
a topical anti-infective, oxidizing agent, and antidote for many poisons. See also permanganate.
potassium phosphate
a cathartic.
potassium pump
see sodium pump.
potassium sodium tartrate
a compound used as a saline cathartic and also in combination with sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid (Seidlitz powders, a cathartic).