condor

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condor

a voiceless, New World vulture; a diurnal bird of prey noted for its large size. Includes Vultur gryphus (Andean condor) and Gymnogyps californianus (Californian condor).
References in periodicals archive ?
115 in Osprey's Combat Aircraft series, Goss describes the early years of the Fw 200 Condor as a German airliner and documents its wartime career when, for about three years, the Condor patrolled the convoy routes between the U.
Freelance writer and photographer Chuck Graham lives one mountain range away from the Condor Trail, where he's spent much time photographing endangered California condors soaring overhead.
In late 1984 and early 1985, six California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) died in the wild, leaving just nine wild and 21 captive condors in the world.
Since we are here, watching out over everything, then we can monitor the condors, and if anything is wrong, let the right people know.
Condors usually do not breed before 8 years of age, and successful pairs tend to lay a single egg every other year.
When hunters kill an animal and fail to remove the entire carcass, condors often feast upon the remains and ingest the toxic metal found in bullets.
It was discovered that condors can indeed breed in captivity and captured wild birds proved invaluable mentors for hatchlings to ensure the chicks develop condor social order.
The condor recovery program has lost many birds to lead poisoning since FWS began releasing condors in 1992, but none in the last three years.
and never really recovered her appetite before she died," said Clark, who has cared for condors for 18 years at the zoo and in the wild.
The Sespe--along with Big Sur, Baja, and an area of Arizona's Grand Canyon--is a nature reserve where, over the past two decades, condors have been saved from extinction through a zoo-based program of capture, breeding, and reintroduction to the wild.
Hopes are high that the condors will breed next year.
The Andean Condor SSP has provided over 70 condors for release into the wild in Colombia and a few in Venezuela over the past 15 years.