condor

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condor

a voiceless, New World vulture; a diurnal bird of prey noted for its large size. Includes Vultur gryphus (Andean condor) and Gymnogyps californianus (Californian condor).
References in periodicals archive ?
and never really recovered her appetite before she died," said Clark, who has cared for condors for 18 years at the zoo and in the wild.
Volunteering for the Condor Program allows me to spend time in truly wild places, while helping condors by monitoring their health and behavior.
Condors simply disappeared, their carcasses unavailable for necropsy.
But things just got a little better for the' California condor, thanks to legislation passed in November.
Once this process was understood, a chelation procedure was employed to remove the lead from the bodies of condors before permanent damage to digestive nerve tissue occurred, but this information could only be gained by trapping birds and taking blood samples.
Before captive-bred condors are ready for release, they must pass power pole aversion training.
The first half of the book traces the condor's history: through the eyes of paleontologists, then through the reverential lore of California native tribes--complete with the uncomfortable fact that a passion for native headdresses made from dead condors may have contributed to the vulture's decline.
WMZ zoological director Nick Jackson said: "By investing directly in condor conservation in their native habitat as well as in our breeding project in Colwyn Bay we can help sustain these magnificent birds into the long-term future.
With nine-and-a-half-foot wingspans and weights up to twenty-eight pounds, California condors are North America's largest fully flighted birds.
Joe Burnett maneuvers cameras that monitor the condors without subjecting the birds to human contact.
These actions alone created a safer environment for the Condors returning to the wild," added Rich Pearson of Edison's customer solutions department.
Requiring non-lead ammunition is the next step in Tejon Ranch's ongoing efforts to protect the California condor, which started in the early 1980s when the Condor Recovery Team used Ranch land to capture some of the last remaining condors for the captive breeding program," said Robert A.