sauce béarnaise syndrome

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sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conditioned taste aversions based on running or swimming.
Possible role of confounded taste stimuli in conditioned taste aversions.
Attenuation of conditioned taste aversion by external stressors.
Effects of swim stress on latent inhibition using a conditioned taste aversion procedure.
Further evidence for conditioned taste aversion induced by forced swimming.
Taste avoidance induced by wheel running: Effects of backward pairings and robustness of conditioned taste aversion.
Hypothermia modifies the effective CS-US interval in conditioned taste aversion in rats.
Acquisition of radiation- and lithium chloride-induced conditioned taste aversions in anesthetized rats.
Whereas 3 hr of preexposure to saccharin was sufficient to attenuate a conditioned taste aversion in weanling and young-adult rats in the Misanin et al.
The present results are supportive of the prediction that increased reactivity engendered by lead exposure would result in stronger conditioned taste aversions.