sauce béarnaise syndrome

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sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conditioned taste aversion and latent inhibition: A review.
Formation of a context-running association in running-based conditioned taste aversion in rats [in Japanese].
Different disruptive effects on the acquisition and expression of conditioned taste aversion by blockades of amygdalar ionotropic and metabotropic glutamatergic receptor subtypes in rats.
Taste discrimination in conditioned taste aversion of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.
Effects of haloperidol or SCH-23390 on ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion.
In the clinic, data similarly demonstrate that immune system parameters can be conditioned to the environment in which chemotherapy is administered and immuno-suppression supports conditioned taste aversion (Bovbjerg et al.
A pair of studies the UCLA scientist published in 1966, 11 years after his first experiments on conditioned taste aversion, provide a vivid demonstration that animals are biologically prepared to learn about taste in a way that differs from how they learn about other sensations.
Acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion becomes context dependent when it is learned after extinction.
Effects of acute swim stress on LiChinduced conditioned taste aversion in rats.
Particularly, Rosas and Bouton (1997) found ABA renewal with a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) procedure, whereas Rosas, Garcia-Gutierrez and Callejas-Aguilera (2007) reported AAB and ABA renewal.
The initially surprising finding of Lett and Grant (1996) that voluntary running in an activity wheel works as an effective agent to establish conditioned taste aversion (CTA) has now been well confirmed by subsequent studies (see Boakes & Nakajima, 2009, for a review).