conchae

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Related to Conchæ: nasal meatus, nasal turbinate

concha

 [kong´kah] (pl. con´chae) (L.)
a shell-shaped structure.
concha of auricle the hollow of the auricle of the external ear, bounded anteriorly by the tragus and posteriorly by the antihelix.
inferior nasal concha a bone forming the lower part of the lateral wall of the nasal cavity.
middle nasal concha the lower of two bony plates projecting from the inner wall of the ethmoidal labyrinth and separating the superior from the middle meatus of the nose.
sphenoidal concha a thin curved plate of bone at the anterior and lower part of the body of the sphenoid bone, on either side, forming part of the roof of the nasal cavity.
superior nasal concha the upper of two bony plates projecting from the inner wall of the ethmoidal labyrinth and forming the upper boundary of the superior meatus of the nose.
supreme nasal concha a third thin bony plate occasionally found projecting from the inner wall of the ethmoidal labyrinth, above the two usually found.

concha

(kong'ka) plural.conchae [Gr. konche, shell]
1. The outer ear or the pinna.
2. One of the three nasal conchae. See: nasal concha

concha auriculae

A concavity on the median surface of the auricle of the ear, divided by a ridge into the upper cymba conchae and a lower cavum conchae. The latter leads to the external auditory meatus.

concha bullosa

A distention of the turbinate bone due to cyst formation.

nasal concha

One of the three scroll-like bones that project medially from the lateral wall of the nasal cavity; a turbinate bone. The superior and middle conchae are processes of the lateral mass of the ethmoid bone; the inferior concha is a facial bone. Each overlies a meatus.

concha sphenoidalis

In a fetal skull, one of the two curved plates located on the anterior portion of the body of the sphenoid bone and forming part of the roof of the nasal cavity.

conchae (kngˑ·k),

n the three bony plates which curve along the outer wall of the nose, creating turbulence and increasing the inner surface area.