paradigm

(redirected from Conceptual scheme)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

paradigm

 [par´ah-dīm]
a shared understanding among scientists or scholars working in a discipline regarding the important problems, structures, values, and assumptions determining that discipline.

paradigm

[per′ədīm, -dim]
a pattern that may serve as a model or example.

paradigm

An example, hypothesis, model, or pattern; a widely accepted explanation for a group of biomedical or other phenomena that become accepted as data accumulate to corroborate aspects of the paradigm's explanation or theory, as occurred in the 'central dogma' of molecular biology. See Central dogma, Paradigm shift.

PARADIGM

Endocrinology A clinical trial–Pramlintide for Amylin Replacement Adjunct for Diabetes in Glycemic Management

paradigm

1. A human being's mental model of the world, which may or may not conform to that of others but is often stereotypical.
2. In the philosophy of science, a general conception of the nature of scientific operation within which a particular scientific activity is undertaken. Paradigms are, of their nature, persistent and hard to change. Major advances in science-such, for instance, as the realization of the concept of the quantum or the significance of evolution in medicine-involve painful paradigmic shifts which some people, notably the older scientists, find hard to make.

paradigm

term introduced ca 1960 by the science-historian Kuhn; a widely followed way of approaching an area of research, deriving from a notable early achievement in the field and carrying forward both its experimental methodology and its theoretical outlook.

paradigm (parˑ··dīmˈ),

n a generally accepted model for making sense of phenomena in a given discipline at a particular time. When one paradigm is replaced by another, it is called a paradigm shift.

paradigm (par″ədīm),

n a model or pattern. The set of values or concepts that represent an accepted way of doing things within an organization or community.
paradigm shift,
n an adjustment in thinking that comes about as the result of new discoveries, inventions, or real-world experiences.

paradigm

a pattern of thought, a similarity of conceptualization.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Shona logical conceptual scheme is unique since their reasoning is focused on practical affairs as opposed to speculative thought.
But according to the conceptual scheme proposed, the result is permeated by the social context; it is not isolated.
Their only guiding principle is the principle of charity: they must interpret the natives as sharing most of the linguists' true beliefs, because as Davidson's arguments against conceptual schemes suggest, disagreement will only make sense against a large background of agreement.
As indicated earlier, the conceptual scheme is potentially fruitful because it speaks more to information behavior concerns rather than information-seeking processes.
Our brief summary of the general epistemology of science, then, posits three mental frameworks that are based on one another: (1) the most general framework or worldview; (2) within the worldview another mental framework supporting all our epistemological activities, called "knowledge structure"; (3) the general scientific conceptual scheme; and (4) the specific scientific conceptual scheme.
Finally, this study contributes a sophisticated conceptual scheme of conflict outcomes.
Which is to say, here any concession to the utilitarian is swiftly recuperated by force of the artist's overarching conceptual scheme.
He describes the intrinsic nature and merits of his philosophical system, which he says is not derived from the West but represents a radical change in the basic conceptual scheme for viewing experience.
Glock distinguishes conceptual from alethic and ontological relativism, defends a distinction between conceptual scheme and empirical content, and rejects the Davidsonian argument against the possibility of alternative conceptual schemes: there can be conceptual diversity without failure of translation, and failure of translation is not necessarily incompatible with recognizing a practice as linguistic.
He fails to realize that one cannot do metaphysics by construing its claims as being merely descriptive of a conceptual scheme we find ourselves to possess without even purporting to establish the legitimacy of that scheme.
He is, however, sharply critical of an existing Kantian or transcendental reading of Wittgenstein advanced by Bernard Williams and Jonathan Lear, according to which there is and can be only one fundamental grammar or conceptual scheme.
Papers by Robert Brandom, Dorothy Grover, Paul Horwich, and Michael Williams defend the deflationist theory of truth, which is most accredited among the epistemic accounts of truth, claiming, namely, that the truth of a statement does not consist in an external relation to a feature of reality but in its possessing a positive epistemic status within our conceptual scheme or within our experience.

Full browser ?