involuntary sterilization

(redirected from Compulsory sterilization)
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involuntary sterilization

Any procedure that renders a legally incompetent person permanently infertile. It is performed only under court order, and only when other less drastic means of preventing unwanted procreation have failed.
See also: sterilization
References in periodicals archive ?
No goose-stepping, brown-shirted thugs here, just ordinary folk inspired by Progressive propaganda to enact laws that would improve mankind by adjusting the contents of its gene pool through compulsory sterilization.
Compulsory sterilization laws, which were passed in 32 states from 1907 to 1937, and resulted in more than 60,000 reproductive surgeries, overwhelmingly performed on poor, undereducated, and minority women and men, epitomize this egregious facet of eugenics.
In 1922, Laughlin published Eugenical Sterilization in the United States to help states pass constitutional compulsory sterilization laws.
When the Nazis established their compulsory sterilization program in 1933, they said they were following "the American pathfinders Madison Grant" and a Grant disciple, Lothrop Stoddard.
Compulsory sterilization was practiced in 30 states, starting with Indiana in 1907.
Between 1907-79, some 30 states adopted compulsory sterilization statutes that were based on widespread acceptance of eugenics, the flawed assumption born of the 19th century mind of Englishman Francis Galton that mental illness, physical disability, and even criminal behavior were inherited characteristics.
14) By the 1920s, 33 states had compulsory sterilization laws.
Compulsory sterilization, also known as forced sterilization is government policies in violation of human rights conventions which attempt to force people to undergo surgical or other sterilization.
America, to its great shame, was in many ways the vanguard of the movement: 31 states passed compulsory sterilization laws in the early 1900s; over 62,000 individuals were sterilized before these practices ended in the 1970s.
In the United Kingdom, Marie Stopes said that she would "legislate compulsory sterilization of the insane, feeble-minded, revolutionary, and half castes.
Historians know about working-class heterosocial culture, and exploring gender and compulsory sterilization is fairly well-trod ground.
The activities of Draper's group encouraged the State Legislatures to enact measures supporting the compulsory sterilization of 75,000 individuals who should not be allowed to breed.