involuntary sterilization

(redirected from Compulsory sterilization)
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involuntary sterilization

Any procedure that renders a legally incompetent person permanently infertile. It is performed only under court order, and only when other less drastic means of preventing unwanted procreation have failed.
See also: sterilization
References in periodicals archive ?
Between 1907-79, some 30 states adopted compulsory sterilization statutes that were based on widespread acceptance of eugenics, the flawed assumption born of the 19th century mind of Englishman Francis Galton that mental illness, physical disability, and even criminal behavior were inherited characteristics.
America, to its great shame, was in many ways the vanguard of the movement: 31 states passed compulsory sterilization laws in the early 1900s; over 62,000 individuals were sterilized before these practices ended in the 1970s.
In the United Kingdom, Marie Stopes said that she would "legislate compulsory sterilization of the insane, feeble-minded, revolutionary, and half castes.
The activities of Draper's group encouraged the State Legislatures to enact measures supporting the compulsory sterilization of 75,000 individuals who should not be allowed to breed.
Gender and Compulsory Sterilization Programs in America: 19071950.
Although the eugenicists "advocated compulsory sterilization for criminals, sex deviants, and the feebleminded," (1) many poor women were sterilized for the simple or flimsy reason as "being considered [too] lazy or [too] promiscuous.
Bell of 1927 (which dealt with compulsory sterilization to prevent transmitting "imbecility"); Skinner v.
Here, "McGoohan" and two chorusing, intermittently bored henchpersons, all in Prisoner-style uniforms, perform a totalitarian rant, addressed to the "spastics" who will comprise their constituency, on topics like the impossibility of widespread success and compulsory sterilization of women and children, taking in Goethe's conception of horticulture along the way.
They insist they do not approve of forced abortion in China yet drag their feet when pro-life Presidents attempt to prevent American tax dollars from underwriting organizations which work hand in glove with those who run forced abortion and compulsory sterilization programs.
Compulsory sterilization was considered negative eugenics (Larson, 2002).
It also examines some of the correspondences that exist between past and present discussions about compulsory sterilization, in particular the co-existence of individual and social reasons for sterilization.
Bell case, which affirmed the constitutionality of laws authorizing the compulsory sterilization of so-called "feeble-minded" residents of state institutions, moral theologian and priest John A.