Compton scattering


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Related to Compton scattering: photoelectric effect, pair production, Compton effect, Thomson scattering

Comp·ton ef·fect

(komp'tŏn),
in the absorption of electromagnetic radiation of medium energy, a decrease in energy of the bombarding photon with the dislodgement of an orbital electron, usually from an outer shell.
Synonym(s): Compton scattering

Comp·ton ef·fect

, Compton scattering (kom'tŏn e-fekt', kom'tŏn skat'ĕr-ing)
Change in wavelength of x-rays or gamma rays due to interaction of electron orbiting nucleus and incidental photon, resulting in scattered photons of lower energy and recoil electrons.

Compton scattering

(komp'ton) [Arthur H. Compton, U.S. physicist and Nobel laureate, 1892–1962]
An interaction between x-rays and matter in which the incoming photon ejects a loosely bound outer-shell electron. The resulting change in the direction of the x-ray photon causes scatter, increasing the dose and degrading the radiographic image. Most interactions between x-rays and matter are of this type, esp. at high energies. See: scatter

Compton,

Arthur H., U.S. physicist, 1892-1962, winner of the 1927 Nobel Prize for his work in physics.
Compton effect - in electromagnetic radiations of medium energy, a decrease in energy of the bombarding photon with the dislodgement of an orbital electron, usually from an outer shell. Synonym(s): Compton scattering
Compton scattering - Synonym(s): Compton effect
References in periodicals archive ?
It also obviates the questionable approximations made in Compton scattering and electron diffraction.
Compton scattering is a quantum process that involves the inelastic scattering of a photon by an electron.
Instead, he suggests, a process called inverse Compton scattering may account for the gamma rays.
Z Backscatter technology based on the X-ray Compton Scattering effect, works by detecting and highlighting "low Z" materials (items that contain low atomic number elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen).
Shwartz also collaborated with scientists from Stanford, SLAC and Berkeley and demonstrated the mixing of an x-ray light with a visible light, and x-ray nonlinear Compton scattering.
And at the highest frequencies, Lazzati would invoke an altogether different emission mechanism: inverse Compton scattering, where energetic electrons knock into a photon and bump it up to higher energies.
As a result, the additional single-notoph mode is detected by the lifetime spectrometer in the "stop" channel by Compton scattering of an electron e of energy [less than or equal to] 0.
They theorized that the observed X-rays were actually generated from gamma rays by the process known as Compton scattering.
Based on the X-ray Compton Scattering effect, Z Backscatter technology works by detecting and highlighting "low Z" materials (items that contain low atomic number elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen).