Compton scattering

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Comp·ton ef·fect

(komp'tŏn),
in the absorption of electromagnetic radiation of medium energy, a decrease in energy of the bombarding photon with the dislodgement of an orbital electron, usually from an outer shell.
Synonym(s): Compton scattering

Comp·ton ef·fect

, Compton scattering (kom'tŏn e-fekt', kom'tŏn skat'ĕr-ing)
Change in wavelength of x-rays or gamma rays due to interaction of electron orbiting nucleus and incidental photon, resulting in scattered photons of lower energy and recoil electrons.

Compton scattering

(komp'ton) [Arthur H. Compton, U.S. physicist and Nobel laureate, 1892–1962]
An interaction between x-rays and matter in which the incoming photon ejects a loosely bound outer-shell electron. The resulting change in the direction of the x-ray photon causes scatter, increasing the dose and degrading the radiographic image. Most interactions between x-rays and matter are of this type, esp. at high energies. See: scatter

Compton,

Arthur H., U.S. physicist, 1892-1962, winner of the 1927 Nobel Prize for his work in physics.
Compton effect - in electromagnetic radiations of medium energy, a decrease in energy of the bombarding photon with the dislodgement of an orbital electron, usually from an outer shell. Synonym(s): Compton scattering
Compton scattering - Synonym(s): Compton effect