compound eye

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com·pound eye

the eye of arthropods, most highly developed in insects and crustaceans; the eye consists of a group of functionally related visual elements (ommatidia) with corneal surfaces that collectively form a segment of a sphere.

compound eye

n.
The eye of most insects and some crustaceans, which is composed of many light-sensitive elements, each having its own refractive system and each forming a portion of an image.

compound eye

see EYE, COMPOUND.
References in periodicals archive ?
domestica head, (red line point to distance between compound eyes, yellow line point to the width of head).
Face including bases of antennae light yellowish brown; compound eyes reddish brown; lateral margins of clypeus black.
Mantis shrimp Each clear outer facet of this compound eye sends light to a single photosensitive structure.
Although superposition compound eyes are exquisitely sensitive, they typically suffer from less sharp vision.
Compound eyes black, ocelli hyaline, without pigmented centripetal crescents, and without pigmented bands from compound eyes to epistomal sulcus.
Set in Haven, a fictional Taiwanese coastal town, The Man with the Compound Eyes is an apocalyptic novel about the transnational solidarity between Alice, a local literature professor, and Atile'i, an outcast washed ashore from a shipwreck.
While you and I, and most other animals on Earth, are equipped with just a pair of standard eyes (simple eyes in biological parlance), some living creatures have compound eyes that are made of thousands of ommatidia.
And stop showing off and pretending you like exo-skeletons, compound eyes, and creatures that vomit on their food before eating it.
Compound eyes are made up of little lenses, each backed by its own light-sensitive cells.
New evidence shows it had astonishingly large compound eyes, giving vision to match or beat most living insects and crustaceans Pic: KATRINA KENNY/UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE /PA WIRE USA Navy divers swim with the urn of Pearl Harbor survivor Lee Soucy.
The fossils represent compound eyes - the multi-faceted variety seen in arthropods such as flies, crabs and kin - and are amongst the largest to have ever existed, with each eye up to 3 cm in length and containing over 16,000 lenses.