chelation

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Related to Complexing agent: Chelating agent, chelate, EDTA

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn),
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; in heme, the Fe2+ ion is chelated by the porphyrin ring. Chelation can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by EDTA, which thus acts as an anticoagulant.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

[kēlā′shən]
a chemical reaction in which there is a combination with a metal to form a ring-shaped molecular complex in which the metal is firmly bound and isolated. See also chelating agent.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, which thus acts as an anticoagulant in vitro.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

the binding of a metal ion to an organic molecule from which it can later be released. In complex molecules, chelation results in, for example, zinc binding with amino acids in carboxypeptidase enzymes. Some chelating agents, such as penicillamine, are drugs used to treat metal poisoning: the metal is bound to the drug and can then be excreted safely Chelation also enables plants to take up metal ions such as iron that are not readily available in a free state.

Chelation

The process by which a molecule encircles and binds to a metal and removes it from tissue.
Mentioned in: Heavy Metal Poisoning

chelation

removal of ions so that they are unavailable to participate in biological reactions; tea chelates dietary iron (Fe2+), preventing its absorption; excessive tea drinking can exacerbate tendency to iron-deficiency anaemia, especially in the elderly

chelation (kē·lāˑ·shn),

n 1. medical treatment in which heavy metals are flushed from the bloodstream by means of a chelator that binds metal ions; used in cases of mercury or lead poisoning.
2. the process of ring formation by forming one or more hydrogen bonds.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation (kēlā´shən),

n chemical reaction of a metallic ion (e.g., calcium ion) with a suitable reactive compound (e.g., ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid) to form a compound in which the metal ion is tightly bound.
chelation therapy,
n the use of a chelating agent to bind firmly and sequester metallic poisons.
References in periodicals archive ?
8-12) Some investigations have also been done concerning the influences of the concentrations of metal salt, reducing agents, complexing agents, temperature, pH, and additives on the deposition rate.
2010, "Effect of complexing agent on growth process and properties of nanostructured [Bi.
In the early eighties, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), which does not require a complexing agent, was very popular because of its high sensitivity, especially when a longer deposition time was e mployed to pre-concentrate the metals.
In tissue fluids and cell culture media, the situation is radically different owing to the presence of a wide variety of natural metal complexing agents (chelators), such as amino acids, peptides, proteins, nucleotides, and glutathione, which may bind and profoundly affect the redox potential of these metals (Holmes and Williams 2000) or their dioxygen coordination capacity (Boca 1983; Van Horn et al.
However, many plant foods also contain endogenous inhibitors that reduce the activity of glycosidases, in particular proteins, peptides, complexing agents and phenolic compounds.
The higher nutrient availability in the runoff may be exploited by dinoflagellates because of the coincidental availability of organic complexing agents (i.
The product range reduces hard complexing agents, such as EDTA, in most formulations whilst maintaining optimal water hardness compatibility.