Royal College of Surgeons of England

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Royal College of Surgeons of England

A professional organisation formed from the Fellowship of Surgeons in the 14th century, which became the Company of Barber-Surgeons under Henry VIII in 1540. The College is committed to enabling surgeons to achieve and maintain the highest standards of surgical practice and patient care.

Members and fellows of The Royal College of Surgeons use the title of Mr, Miss, Mrs, or Ms (not Dr), a custom which began in the 16th century. When the College of Surgeons received its royal charter, the Royal College of Physicians insisted that candidates must have a medical degree first and receive the title of Doctor. Because they were more trained than doctors, surgeons reverted to the title "Mr" as  a means to rebuff the Royal College of Physicians.

Royal College of Surgeons of England’s remit
• Supervise training of surgeons in approved posts;
• Provide educational and practical workshops for surgeons and other medical professionals;
• Examine trainees to ensure the highest professional standards;
• Promote and support surgical research in the UK;
• Support audit and evaluation of clinical effectiveness;
• Provide support and advice for surgeons in all stages of their careers;
• Provide a mechanism whereby trusts can seek independent advice;
• House current and historical information resources for surgeons in the library and museums;
• Advise the UK Department of Health, health authorities, Trusts, hospitals and other professional bodies;
• Collaborate with other medical and academic organisations in the UK and worldwide;
• Convey the importance of, and provide support for, good, effective communication and interpersonal relationships with patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elizabeth Malson (in 1676/7) and Mary Ellinor (in 1708) were executed and subsequently dissected at the Anatomy Theatre of the Worshipful Company of Barber-Surgeons for exactly the same crime, not because a judge ordained it but because the Barber-Surgeons had a legal right to four executed felons per year for pedagogical purposes.