companion

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Related to Companion star: Binary star system

companion

Social medicine An individual with whom a person has a close personal relationship Examples Spouses, lovers, children, parents, friends, pets and others, who provide an individual with a sense of belonging and of being needed. See Companionship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally the companion star at ~16 magnitude puts this within reach of many amateur telescopes which can then contribute valuable data.
A team of astronomers have now spotted a black hole companion star with too many heavy elements.
The companion star is about 125 times the volume of our sun, and towers over the tiny white dwarf, which is about the size of the Earth -- this is similar to comparing a hot air balloon and a marble.
The blast of gas then slammed into the companion star, creating a shock wave and an ultraviolet glow.
The companion star stole a bunch of hydrogen before the primary star exploded.
The team combined optical light data and Hubble's UV light images to construct a spectrum that matched the predicted glow of a companion star, also known as the continuum emission.
In eight of these systems the black holes are likely capturing material from companion stars that are much more massive than the Sun.
This discovery, made in parallel with a radio telescope in Australia, provides scientists unique insight into the formation of neutron stars and supernovas, and the effect of the supernova's explosion on a nearby companion star.
In this case HR 5171 A is orbited by its companion star every 1300 days.
The stars likely formed at the same time, but the main star appears to be 3 billion to 3 1/2 billion years younger than its companion star because it rotates faster, displays higher levels of magnetic activity and is about 30 times brighter in X-rays than its companion.
In T Pyx's scenario, the white dwarf pulls enough hydrogen and other material from its companion star to trigger an explosion.
To an observer on the planet, the companion star would appear as a ruddy point of light about as bright as a full moon.