commensalism

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commensalism

 [kŏ-men´sal-izm]
symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm),
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed; for example, Entamoeba coli in the human large intestine. Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism.
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

/com·men·sal·ism/ (-izm) symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

commensalism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

commensalism

[kəmen′səliz′əm]
a symbiosis in which one species benefits but the other species is neither helped nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm)
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed.
Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antimicrobial drug-resistance rates of Escherichia coli as part of commensal flora in children, Bolivia and Peru, 2002 and 2005 * Drug ([dagger]) 2002 2005 p value ([double dagger]) AMP 95 96 <0.
For example, the collection using a swab is a superficial process that may lead to the cultivation of large numbers of commensal flora.
Commensal flora may play key role in spreading antibiotic resistance.
Use of leftover drugs may increase antimicrobial drug resistance in the community by exerting selective pressure in the commensal flora (3,4).
Prevalence, expressed as percentage, of healthy children carrying antimicrobial drug-resistant Escherichia coli as part of their commensal flora and of children in whom resistant E.
When infections are treated with an antimicrobial agent, all bacteria in the host are affected, including the commensal flora, which could result in the selection of resistant commensals, particularly in children who are administered oral antimicrobial drugs too frequently.