commensalism

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commensalism

 [kŏ-men´sal-izm]
symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm),
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed; for example, Entamoeba coli in the human large intestine. Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism.
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

/com·men·sal·ism/ (-izm) symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.

commensalism

(kə-mĕn′sə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one derives some benefit while the other is unaffected.

commensalism

[kəmen′səliz′əm]
a symbiosis in which one species benefits but the other species is neither helped nor harmed.

com·men·sal·ism

(kŏ-men'săl-izm)
A symbiotic relationship in which one species derives benefit and the other is unharmed.
Compare: metabiosis, mutualism, parasitism
[L. con-, with, together, + mensa, table]

commensalism

symbiosis in which one population (or individual) is benefited and the other is neither benefited nor harmed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our microbial self: essential functions for commensal bacteria on the skin.
European survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility among zoonotic and commensal bacteria isolated from food-producing animals.
Of the four commensal bacteria tested, Clostridium nexile was the most sensitive strain, whereas Lactobacillus casei was effectively resistant even at the highest (1%) concentration of garlic.
Our results indicate that garlic powder has temporal effect on the gut commensal bacteria.
Plant roots Biofilm-forming commensal bacteria live on certain plant roots (Janczarek et al.
Commensal bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics, metals, and other environmental stressors.
In earlier experiments, scientists had shown that commensal bacteria can help fend off bad bacteria in the intestines.
Despite the recent and rapid growth in probiotics, there still exists a great deal of further commercial opportunity in harnessing the innate power of these commensal bacteria.
NARMS monitors changes in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in zoonotic bacteria (those that can transmit diseases from lower animals to humans) and in commensal bacteria (those that live within livestock or humans without making them sick).
10:45am-11:30am Commensal Bacteria as a Novel Delivery
SIGA's lead product development programs focus on biological warfare defense, mucosal vaccines for strep throat and sexually transmitted diseases, commensal bacteria for the delivery of vaccines and protein therapeutics and novel antibiotics for gram positive and gram negative bacteria.