combustion

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combustion

 [kom-bus´chun]
rapid oxidation with emission of heat.

com·bus·tion

(kom-bŭs'chŭn),
Burning, the rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]

combustion

/com·bus·tion/ (kom-bus´chun) rapid oxidation with emission of heat.

combustion

[kəmbus′chen]
the process of burning or oxidation, which may be accompanied by light and heat. Oxygen itself does not burn, but it supports combustion. The rate of combustion is influenced by both oxygen concentration and its partial pressure.

com·bus·tion

(kŏm-bŭs'chŭn)
Burning; rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]

combustion

rapid oxidation with emission of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
What it's really about is teaching pilots enough combustion theory so that they can rationally think about and decide on engine operating strategies for themselves, regardless of what an old school A&P may suggest.
Laboratory testing and combustion theory has shown that simply selecting a maximum Wobbe Index is insufficient to address incomplete combustion over a range of gas compositions (especially for natural gas with heating values in excess of about 1,100 Btu/scf.
Mathematical combustion theory and terrestrial experiments show that there are two basic types of explosion.