colloquialism

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Related to Colloquial speech: COLLOQ

colloquialism

Vox populi A term of ordinary everyday speech, conversational. See Medical slang.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, colloquial speech tends to reduce a speech pattern to its most convenient form, stopping just short of the point where intelligibility will be compromised.
While contraction or the reduction of unstressed syllables is characteristic of all colloquial speech, according to Fought, it is particularly extreme in Mountain Southern (i.
Users of colloquial speech have kidnapped "awesome," and even "tragic" seems insufficient to adequately express what so many of us feel.
The strategy to combat this problem is to teach students about the differences between colloquial speech and standard English, Story says.
the use of various verb tenses, colloquial speech, reported speech; a glossary of the main terms used in discussing translation and analyzing the source texts, including a list of nine translation strategies as defined by J.
Modern English resulted from written text shaped by five factors: (a) brevity induced from accounting/administrative format; (b) aural/oral-based text, written to be heard and seen, that produced conversational style; (c) persistence of indigenous subject-verb-object syntax found in the earliest English documents; (d) a growing Renaissance book market of literate middle-class readers responding to speech-based prose; and (e) English scriptural renditions of the late Renaissance that associated colloquial speech with Protestantism.
There are no pages, or even paragraphs, from Saroyan's work, though time and again the book calls for them and even whets your appetite: "[Saroyan] had an ear for the rhythm, sonority, and sensuality of colloquial speech.
Idiocy, then, was a term which appeared in the formal laws of Massachusetts but apparently never in the colloquial speech of ordinary inhabitants.
By examining primary sources, including songs, newspapers, interviews, and photographs of migrant farm workers in California during the Great Depression, students create a scrapbook from the point of view of a migrant worker, providing evidence of the colloquial speech used by the migrants and the issues affecting their lives.
And in a book where the prose is often elegant and passionate, there is far too much colloquial speech.
He draws attention also to the wide use of metaphor and metonymy in colloquial speech, explaining it with reference to the incapacite abstraire and the tendency towards la concretisation de l'abstrait present in the language of uneducated speakers.
Inscriptions, sculpted in stone, with no little labour and therefore at no little expense, are designed to last and are likely to use formal, public, conventional language that will outlive the vagaries of colloquial speech.