colloquialism

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Related to Colloquial expression: COLLOQ, List of colloquialisms

colloquialism

Vox populi A term of ordinary everyday speech, conversational. See Medical slang.
References in periodicals archive ?
We even have a colloquial expression for it, "a pat on the back.
Cloud computing is a colloquial expression used to describe a variety of different computing concepts that involve a large number of computers that are connected through a real-time communication network (typically the Internet).
It is not, to use the misleading colloquial expression, a banker
It became a colloquial expression that is still employed to characterize something as nonsensical or a form of trickery.
Mr Carman: "The reality is that you made this telephone call to Wendy in his presence because you trusted this man and to use a colloquial expression you were two mates together.
It almost never reaches for a current or common colloquial expression, yet, as poetry, it does not feel burdened by traditions, Indian, literary (e.
Sure, he uses a lot of obscure and obsolete words, perhaps reflecting the things he's reading himself, mainly classical Arabic texts and philosophical works, but on the other hand, you never have to grapple with colloquial expressions in his texts, and I'm very grateful for that.
There are tons of colloquial expressions we use to refer to God," she points out--think of phrases like "Oh my God," for instance.
Aquino used two other colloquial expressions to poke fun at Binay.
Furthermore, the get-passive is likely to co-occur with verbs referring to daily activities, such as get changed, cleaned, dressed, shaved or washed, and with colloquial expressions, for instance, get kicked (out), muddled (up), nicked, pissed or sacked, which highlights the informal nature of the get-passive.
Fathers and Sons flows with the conversational ease and the charm of the distinctively Irish colloquial expressions that permeate Friel's other work.
For example, some of the humour in the colloquial expressions was lost on local audience members and the dichotomy between a national and a private school is a phenomenon mostly present in cities like Cairo and Alexandria.