collective noun

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collective noun

a word used to indicate a group of things, e.g. animals as in gaggle of geese, pod of whales. See Table 20.
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As regards the former, twenty-three singular collective nouns that usually take of-complementation were included: band, batch, bunch, class, clump, couple, crowd, flock, gang, group, herd, host, majority, minority, number, pack, party, rash, series, set, shoal, swarm and troop.
The lexical item cattle can be preceded by collective nouns, such as a drove, a spread, a herd, in partitive constructions, for example, a herd of cattle.
Like collective nouns, specific amounts, whether of money, weight, time, or distance, are considered singular when the amount is treated as a unit.
In the Arabic language, shajar 'forest' as a collective noun is uncountable.
Abandonment of cuckoos and zephyr of long-tailed titmice are among the lesser-known collective nouns in the book, although the old favourites such as gaggle of geese and covert of coots are there.
Collective nouns such as committee, family, or team are all too often erroneously defined as semantically plural but grammatically singular, as nouns that have "singular form but plural meaning" (Chelaru-Ionita and Bantas 1981:224).
There's many collective nouns for Mac users, but my favourite is 'smug'.
Langford and Sarullo (1993) discuss the importance of introducing the notion of collective nouns to children who are developing their language of fractions with unit-set models.
Jespersen, for instance, defines collectives as "words which denote a unit made up of several things or beings which may be counted separately" (Persson 1989), and Levin (2001: 13), the latest scholar to discuss it to my knowledge, calls collective nouns "singular nouns denoting groups of entities and taking plural targets".
I'm told that it's a peculiar of collective nouns, which may sound strange, but it's no odder than some of the other group names I've recently discovered.
Collective nouns for animals are an enduring source of interest and this book takes delight in them in both the text and illustration.
The exhibition focuses on collective nouns and has evolved from project creator Alan Golding's love of language and animals.

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