Cola nitida

cola tree

An evergreen shrub, the berries of which stimulate cardiorespiratory responses. Cola berries have been used by herbalists for anorexia, asthma, diarrhoea in irritable bowel syndrome, fluid retention, headaches and migraines, hangovers, indigestion, and motion sickness.

Toxicity
Cola berries are contraindicated in patients with hypertension, coronary heart disease, hypercholesterolaemia, history of stroke, and pregnancy.

Cola nitida,

n See tree, cola.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Investors can take advantage of the proven demand for medicinal plants from Ghana and the suitability of the environment for the cultivation of various medicinal plants such as Cola Nitida (locally known as bese), Alchornea Cordifolia (ogyama), Griffonia Simplicifolia (Kagya), etc.
Abulade FO Composition and properties of cola nitida and cola acuminate flour in Nigeria.
Previous works have demonstrated that stem bark extracts of Cola nitida (Sterculiaceae), Afrormosia laxiflora and Pterocarpus erinaceus (Fabaceae) provoked a blockade of female rat ovulation and estrous cycle by inhibiting pituitary LH release in vivo.
Key words: Afrormosia laxiflora, Pterocarpus erinaceus, Cola nitida, LH and FSH release, inhibitory effect, serum inactivation
Afrormosia laxiflora, Cola nitida and Pterocarpus erinaceus extracts had long been used in Cote d'Ivoire as folk remedies in several diseases (Ake-Assi, 1984).
But several studies had demonstrated that Cola nitida, Afrormosia laxiflora, Pterocarpus erinaceus extracts contained a high number of phenolic compounds: catechin, quinic acid, tannic acid, chlorogenic acid and flavonoids for Cola nitida (Rakotoarison et al.
Cola nuts Cola nitida, from a lowland evergreen, act as a stimulant to the nervous system, to counteract fatigue or depression.