coinfection

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coinfection

 [ko´in-fek″shun]
simultaneous infection by separate pathogens, as by hepatitis B and hepatitis D viruses.

coinfection

/co·in·fec·tion/ (ko´in-fek″shun) simultaneous infection by separate pathogens, as by hepatitis B and hepatitis D viruses.

coinfection

[ko′in-fek′shun]
simultaneous infection of a cell or organism by separate pathogens, as by hepatitis B and hepatitis D viruses.
The simultaneous presence of 2 or more infections, which may increase the severity and duration of one or both
Examples Babesiosis/Lyme disease; syphilis/HIV

coinfection

The simultaneous presence of 2 or more infections, which may ↑ disease severity and duration

co·in·fec·tion

(kō'in-fek'shŭn)
Concurrent infection by two or more pathogens.

Coinfection

Invasion of the body by two viruses at about the same time.
Mentioned in: Hepatitis D
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of its nature as an intracellular spirochete, similar to HIV as an intracellular virus, the Borrelia species and its family of coinfections reduce the function and number of T cells, mainly natural killer cells in many patients.
But when these flulike symptoms are particularly pronounced and the patient does not respond to standard Lyme treatment, consider the possibility of babesial coinfection, Dr.
Lyme patients often have digestive issues, which can be caused by the Borrelia and coinfections themselves, by opportunistic infections such as intestinal parasites, yeast overgrowth, and H.
If I need more solid grounding on coinfections, I will use IGeneX.
Miltefosine was used in 2 patients with HIV coinfection who had relapses, but relapses recurred, 1 while the patient was still receiving the drug (9).
Moreover, 7 of 9 specimens with NoV GI/GII coinfection exhibited higher eDNA viral load of GII than that of GI.
Many distinct causative agents transmitted by the same vector make coinfection and, consequently, the simultaneous presence of more than 1 tickborne disease possible.
We believe that the techniques we used should have been sensitive enough to detect such coinfections, and that competition between two Bartonella species may result in one species being eliminated and the flea becoming infected with the other Bartonella species, Further studies are indicated to confirm this possibility.
Moreover, this system detects a higher proportion of coinfections than typing by DNA sequencing of several genetic loci, probably because it is more sensitive at detecting alleles present in low amounts (11,13).
Polymicrobial diseases involve multiple infectious agents and are referred to as complex, complicated, mixed, dual, secondary, synergistic, concurrent, polymicrobial, coinfections.
These presentations emphasized the importance of considering coinfections in chronic disease pathology.