cohort

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Related to Cohorts: Cohort Analysis

cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

/co·hort/ (ko´hort)
1. in epidemiology, a group of individuals sharing a common characteristic and observed over time in the group.
2. a taxonomic category approximately equivalent to a division, order, or suborder in various systems of classification.

cohort

[kō′hôrt]
Etymology: L, cohortem, large group
(in statistics) a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as members of the same age or the same sex.

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.

cohort

defined population or group sharing a common factor
  • birth cohort group of children born at a similar time, and studied prospectively throughout life

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort,

n in statistics, a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as the same age or sex.
cohort study,
n a scientific study that focuses on a specific subpopulation, such as children born on a certain date in a specific environment.

cohort

in epidemiology a group of individuals who share a characteristic acquired at the same time. The term usually refers to a birth cohort, which contains animals born in a specified time period.

cohort studies
a prospective or follow-up, analytical, epidemiological study. The investigation identifies a group of animals which have the hypothesized cause and which are free of the disease of interest, and a comparison group of animals which are free of the hypothesized cause. Both groups, the cohorts, are followed over time to determine the incidence rates of the disease in question in each of the two groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enrollment, Dosing Completed In AIS-B 10 Million Cell Cohort
With use of the World War II cohort as the reference group for comparison, the odds ratio for arthritis in Gen Xers was 3.
Cohort 2 professors are marked by growing maturity and confidence.
The interpretation is that even though the 1915 cohort were, on average, 2 years older than the 1905 cohort, this study suggests that more people are living to older ages with better overall functioning--at least in Denma .
In particular, the longer "time to build" process documented by Ellison (2002) has a measurable, but not uniformly dramatic, effect on publication success of all cohorts in terms of AER-equivalent pages published by graduates of the top 30 programs.
In a third example, the cohorts are defined by groups of people who are within a range of five years of age.
To construct the prediction of the aggregate LFP rate for 2008-12, we assign, for cohorts born after 1991, the average cohort effect of the last 20 cohorts.
Turning to the question of how earlier cohorts fared, the authors look at the change in assets from 1994 to 1998 for the "HRS Cohort" (ages 53 to 58 in 1994) and the change from 2000 to 2004 for the "War Babies" (ages 53 to 58 in 2000).
OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to create a comprehensive overview of European birth cohorts with environmental exposure data.
The current study's aim was to compare the life expectancy among two different cohorts enrolled in the prospective Pittsburgh EDC Study of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.
Patients in both cohorts were sent home with aspirin and a study coordinator screened them for complications on day one and one week after the discharge.
This kind of data set has a 4-level hierarchical structure: time-series observation nested within students who are nested within different cohorts of students.