cohort

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cohort

 [ko´hort]
in research and statistics, a group of individuals who share a characteristic at some specific time and who are then followed forward in time, with data being collected at one or more suitable intervals. The most common use of the term is to describe a birth cohort, in which all the group members are born in a specified time period, but other common characteristics could define the cohort, such as marriage date, exposure to an infectious agent, or date of diagnosis or of treatment for a disease.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt),
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epidemiologic cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

/co·hort/ (ko´hort)
1. in epidemiology, a group of individuals sharing a common characteristic and observed over time in the group.
2. a taxonomic category approximately equivalent to a division, order, or suborder in various systems of classification.

cohort

[kō′hôrt]
Etymology: L, cohortem, large group
(in statistics) a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as members of the same age or the same sex.

cohort

EBM
A subgroup of a population with a common feature, usually age (e.g., all persons in the UK born in 1964 form a birth cohort).

Social medicine
A group of persons born at about the same time who share common historical or cultural experiences.

Trials
A group of persons or animals of the same species with a common characteristic, set of characteristics, or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study.

cohort

Clinical trials A group of persons with a common characteristic, set of characteristics or exposure, who are followed for the incidence of new diseases or events, as in a cohort for a prospective study. See Birth cohort, Cluster, Inception cohort.

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
1. Component of the population born during a particular period and identified by period of birth so that its characteristics can be ascertained as it enters successive time and age periods.
2. Any designated group followed or traced over a period, as in an epide miological cohort study.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort

A group of persons all born on the same day. Cohort studies are valuable in medical and epidemiological research.

cohort

a group of organisms in a population all of which are the same age.

cohort

defined population or group sharing a common factor
  • birth cohort group of children born at a similar time, and studied prospectively throughout life

co·hort

(kō'hōrt)
Designated group followed or traced over a period.
[L. cohors, retinue, military unit]

cohort,

n in statistics, a collection or sampling of individuals who share a common characteristic, such as the same age or sex.
cohort study,
n a scientific study that focuses on a specific subpopulation, such as children born on a certain date in a specific environment.

cohort

in epidemiology a group of individuals who share a characteristic acquired at the same time. The term usually refers to a birth cohort, which contains animals born in a specified time period.

cohort studies
a prospective or follow-up, analytical, epidemiological study. The investigation identifies a group of animals which have the hypothesized cause and which are free of the disease of interest, and a comparison group of animals which are free of the hypothesized cause. Both groups, the cohorts, are followed over time to determine the incidence rates of the disease in question in each of the two groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
The strong trend of individual cohorts lining up chronologically in decreasing productivity (with the 1999 cohort being only slightly more productive than the 1996 cohort) does not hold, however, if we switch our productivity measure from AER-equivalent publications to AER-equivalent pages.
What differentiates YouAppi's Actionable Cohort Analysis when compared with other app targeting solutions is our reliance on 1[sup.
We also analyzed cohort effects in the three male cohorts born from 1955 to 1969 by comparing the curve for suicide rates, first with and then without the cohort effect(Figure 3).
The 350,000 mother--child pairs covered by European birth cohorts form an impressive number, but of course this is only a small percentage of all births in Europe [(> 5 million births annually in 25 EU countries (Eurostat 2011)].
cohort and the next is the same as for a set of cohorts observed over the last full business cycle.
Although the final outcome could be due to other dietary factors, these large cohort studies are a good indicator of the importance of dietary sources of Se and the prevention of T2DM and potentially other chronic diseases.
In the first part of our empirical work we review the evidence on changes in [beta] and its components for older cohorts in the UK.
The sequence in which the cohorts would be invited to the campus would be as per the batch preference.
Incoming students form nonresidential cohorts built on a significant commonality, and they work together throughout their four years in the program.
To allow for a fair comparison of the two cohorts, factors influencing the success or failure of high-tech startups, such as year-specific and industry-mix effects, are examined.
Inappropriate requests for information were made in 12 percent of the cases in Cohort 1 and 4 percent of the cases in Cohort 2.
Although the literature analysis found that younger birth cohorts in North America, especially those born after World War II, are more likely than other cohorts to engage in heavy episodic drinking and develop AUDs, this cohort effect was not found in Australia and Western Europe.