cohabit

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cohabit

(kō-hăb′ĭt)
intr.v. cohab·ited, cohab·iting, cohab·its
1. To live together in a sexual relationship, especially when not legally married.
2. To coexist, as animals of different species.

co·hab′i·tant, co·hab′it·er n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion n.
co·hab′i·ta′tion·al adj.

cohabit

verb To live, sleep and have sexual relations with a partner as if in a married partnership (though usually without legal marriage).
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the selection approach, it could be expected that cohabitation is chosen by those whose attitudes are more liberal and they do not highlight marriage as an important life event, furthermore they wish to have fewer children than married people (Nock 1995).
Cohabitation formed the second category and in the third group were those, who do not prefer one type or other.
The subjective norm was represented by the students' opinion about the parents' attitudes towards their cohabitation.
In the current study, the odds of preferring cohabitation and the odds of having no union-formation intention are measured against the odds of preferring marriage.
Thus, even in the last year of the panel, cohabitation is clearly more widespread than legal marriage.
As a result, we are able to achieve a cleaner identification of the marriage and cohabitation wage differentials than was possible in previous studies where a majority of the sample entered married.
it], includes indicators for mutually exclusive marriage, cohabitation, divorce/separation, and past cohabitation; quadratic duration measures for these states; and variables reflecting the age and presence of children and of fatherhood.
Finally, columns 5-6 show the estimated coefficients from a specification in which marriage and cohabitation are treated as distinct relationships.
If this is the mechanism driving the marital wage differential, then cohabiting men may also experience a wage boost, albeit a smaller one, as cohabitation is a less stable relationship and less likely to engender specialization.
Loh further postulates that men whose current marriage began with cohabitation should receive a wage differential but finds no evidence of such.
The greater legal responsibilities imposed by marriage could have a greater "settling effect" on men than cohabitation.
Schoen and Weinick (1993) suggest that cohabitation is an alternative to marriage.