Code for Nurses

Code for Nurses

a set of guidelines for carrying out nursing responsibilities adopted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) in 1985. In 1994, the American Nurses Association determined that these guidelines were nonnegotiable and determined that each nurse had an obligation to adhere to the Code, and in 2001 a completely revised version of the Code of Ethics for Nurses was accepted by the ANA.

Code for Nurses

A statement by the American Nurses Association to guide nurses in their legal and ethical practice.

The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems. The nurse's primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient. The nurse is responsible and accountable for individual nursing practice and determines the appropriate delegation of tasks consistent with the nurse's obligation to provide optimum patient care. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth. The nurse participates in establishing, maintaining, and improving health care environments and conditions of employment conducive to the provision of quality health care and consistent with the values of the profession through individual and collective action. The nurse participates in the advancement of the profession through contributions to practice, education, administration, and knowledge development. The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public in promoting community, national, and international efforts to meet health needs. The profession of nursing, as represented by associations and their members, is responsible for articulating nursing values, for maintaining the integrity of the profession and its practice, and for shaping social policy.

[Reprinted with permission from American Nurses Association, Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, ©2001 American Nurses Publishing, American Nurses Foundation/American Nurses Association, Washington, DC.]

References in periodicals archive ?
We plan to increase awareness about the ANA Code for Nurses as the source from which we maintain our leadership on ethical issues.
Adherence to Code for Nurses The issues addressed by these scenarios are behavior and professional dress.
The first item in the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code for Nurses with Interpretative Statements (2001) addresses respect for human dignity:
Lobbying efforts on a state level by the VSNA provide evaluation of proposed legislation and regulatory issues and their effect on nursing practice and the quality of health care delivery; as well as opposition to legislation which impinges on the ethical practice of nursing as defined by the Code for Nurses.
Ethics and human rights position statement: The nonnegotiable nature of the ANA Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements.
2) American Nurses' Association (ANA), (1985) Code for Nurses.
The American Nurses' Association's Code for Nurses has a provision that illustrates the value placed on collective bargaining as a way of ensuring high quality nursing care.
The theme of citizenship was explicit even in the first efforts by the American Nurses Association (ANA) to develop a nursing code of ethics in the late 1920s, although the first ethics code for nurses was not officially approved by the ANA until 1950.
from the American Nurses Association Code for Nurses or generalized ethical principles or legal precepts) is not referenced in the text or bibliography.
American Nurses' Association, Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Kansas City: American Nurses' Association, 1976;1985).
As caring healers, teachers and patient advocates in an ever-changing health care environment, we are empowered by the code for nurses.
Linane said, however, it was encouraging that the RN article noted that the Code for Nurses with Interpretative Statements states, "If ethically opposed to interventions in a particular case because of the procedures to be used, the nurse is justified in refusing to participate.