cochineal

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Related to Cochineal extract: Natural Red 4

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl'), [C.I. 75470]
The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain. See: carmine.
Synonym(s): coccinella, coccus (2)
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]

cochineal

/coch·i·neal/ (koch´ĭ-nēl) dried female insects of Coccus cacti, enclosing young larvae; used as a coloring agent for pharmaceuticals and as a biological stain.

cochineal

[koch′inēl′]
Etymology: L, coccineus, bright red
a red dye prepared from the dried female insects of the species Coccus cacti containing young larvae. During the preparation of the dye the larvae are extracted with an aqueous solution of alum. The resulting dye has been used in coloring medicines.

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl)
[CI 75470] The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain.
See: carmine
Synonym(s): coccus (2) .
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
References in periodicals archive ?
1) The next year, vegans were outraged to learn that Starbucks used cochineal extract, a color additive derived from insect shells, to dye their strawberry Frappuccino[R] drinks (2) (eventually, the company decided to transition to lycopene, a pigment found in tomatoes (3)).
Although substances like castoreum and cochineal extract may be long on the "yuck factor," (4) research has shown them to be perfectly safe for most people; strident opposition arose not from safety issues but from the ingredients' origins.
This spring, Starbucks, the Seattle based-coffee giant, made headlines over the company's use of cochineal extract as a colorant in four food and two beverage offerings in the U.
While eating cochineal extract poses no risk to healthy consumers, the term "insect" does not exactly sound appetizing on a label.
They're also talking about natural additives such as annatto extract, carrot oil, turmeric, vegetable juices and the controversial cochineal extract, whose characteristic rosy hue is derived from the eggs of the Peruvian cochineal beetle.
FDA may require clearer labeling of food additives: Food & Drug Administration is now in the process of considering a proposal to require color additives like the cochineal extract to be disclosed on the labels of all foods that use them.