coca

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co·ca

(kō'kă),
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; the source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]

coca

a species of South American shrubs native to Bolivia and Peru and cultivated in Indonesia. The leaves are dried and then chewed for their stimulant effect by some of the people of the region. It is a natural source of cocaine.

co·ca

(kō'kă)
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]

coca,

n Latin name:
Erythroxylum spp.; part used: leaves; uses: quicken activity of the physiologic process, astringent, anesthetic, relieve hunger, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, stomach pains; stimulate central nervous system; stimulate muscular activity; relieve neurasthenia, dilate pupils; paralyze sensory nerve fibers; pre-cautions: addictive, hallucinations and delusions, can cause restlessness, tremors; convulsions, emaciation, memory loss, sleeplessness, severe agitation, tachycardia, perspiration, elevated blood pressure. Also called
cuca and
cocaine.

coca

see cocaine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further research still needs to be carried out to see whether the Eloria noyesi caterpillar feeds on all six species of coca plants used in Colombia for cocaine production.
Because the genesis of the drug lies in US chemical factories, not in coca plants, the US is the source country, not Bolivia, not Peru, not Colombia.
Morales is the first Bolivian president of indigenous descent and a former union leader for coca plant farmers.
Cannabis, opium poppies, tobacco and the coca plant - the source of cocaine - feature in the centuries-old Alnwick Garden in Northumberland.
Derived from the leaves of the coca plant, it has many names on the street, including coke, C, snow, flake, and blow.
From that strain, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) developed the strain "Isolate EN-4," which is supposed to attack only the coca plant, and which the US and UN want to spray extensively in Colombia.
And if we were to take this questionable and misguided argument to its logical conclusion, the Aboriginal people of Peru and Columbia once chewed the leaves of a small plant called the coca plant.
The coca plant is protected by the cocaine it synthesizes, while coffee, tea, and mate get longevity from caffeine.
Cocaine is extracted from the leaves of the coca plant.
It has built-in resistance to local bugs, and unlike tomatoes, rice, or beans - which have to be reseeded each season - a single coca plant can last forty years.