coagulative necrosis


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coagulative necrosis

necrotic tissue which is firm, retains its architectural pattern and is dense in comparison to surrounding tissue. See also liquefactive necrosis, Zenker's necrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In animals inoculated with fetal blood the coagulative necrosis and inflammation manifested in a discrete intensity while the other lesions found presented itself in a mild intensity (Table 2).
Single green arrow indicating extravasation of blood from blood vessel, resulting in coagulative necrosis of first and second proximal segments and black arrow showing irregular blood congestion; red arrow indicate tubular necrosis.
Dense fibrous tissue was present with a large area of coagulative necrosis with areas of haemorrhage.
Histological evaluation of amputated specimens showed widespread coagulative necrosis and inflammation of skin, subcutaneous tissue and even muscle and bone in some cases.
The technology, known as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), induces coagulative necrosis of fibroids via thermoablation.
Several authors have established that during the preulcerative stage and early in the ulcerative stage, the coagulative necrosis forms a nidus where calcifications and AFB colonies are easily visualized (8,9,12,17).
High Intensity Focused Ultrasound is then delivered to the focal point to heat and destroy -- through coagulative necrosis -- the malignant cells.
The presence of extensive coagulative necrosis can make diagnosis difficult to make in small biopsies.
Presence of diffuse nuclear atypia, epithelioid cytology, coagulative necrosis, ulceration and mucosal invasion were adverse prognostic factors while small size, low mitotic activity and presence of skeinoid fibers were favorable prognostic factors.
Histology results reveal coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and sometimes superficial dermis and follicular epithelium with dermal vesicular degeneration that can result in edema, subepidermal vesicles, thrombosis, infarction, sloughing of necrotic tissues, and secondary bacterial infection.
Coagulative necrosis and an abundance of histiocytes can often be seen in KFD.
Severe coagulative necrosis of the intestinal mucosa may be found in enteritis due to PCV2 infection and can lead to a gross misdiagnosis of PE (JENSEN et al.