coagulase

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coagulase

 [ko-ag´u-lās]
a bacterial enzyme that reacts with a cofactor found in blood plasma to catalyze the formation of fibrin from fibrinogen. It is produced by most of the virulent strains of staphylococci, and by Yersinia pestis.

coagulase

/co·ag·u·lase/ (-lās) an antigenic substance of bacterial origin, produced by staphylococci, which may be causally related to thrombus formation.

coagulase

(kō-ăg′yə-lās′, -lāz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes, such as rennin or thrombin, that induce coagulation.

coagulase

[kō·ag′yəlās]
Etymology: L, coagulare, to curdle
an enzyme produced by bacteria, particularly Staphylococcus aureus, that promotes the formation of fibrin from fibrinogen to form thrombi.

coagulase

An enzyme secreted by the micro-organism Staphylococcus aureus that causes clotting in blood plasma by converting prothrombin to thrombin. This ability probably contributes to the tendency of the organism to form abscesses.

coagulase

an antigenic substance of bacterial origin, produced chiefly by staphylococci, which may be causally related to thrombus formation.

coagulase test
enzymatic conversion of fibrinogen in rabbit plasma to fibrin is used as a means of identifying pathogenic species of staphylococci. The test may be carried out rapidly on a slide or in several hours or overnight in a tube. Most coagulase-positive staphyloccoci are pathogenic; coagulase-negative ones commonly are not.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common organisms in the hospital sepsis cohort Organism n Escherichia coli 3 Alpha streptococci 3 Beta hemolytic streptococci 3 Staphylococcus aureus 2 Coagulase-negative staphylococci 2 Bacteroides fragilis 1 Proteus mirabilis 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae 1 Enterococcus faecalis 1 Propionibacterium acnes 1 Capnocytophaga canimorsus 1
4% MRSA), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 115); Enterococcus faecalis (25); E.
Fifteen-year experience with bloodstream isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci in neonatal intensive care.
The aspirate grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species and Serratia marcescens.
aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, strongly suggest that acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis is the cause of the disease in the affected patients.
The remaining isolates consisted of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, [alpha]-hemolytic Streptococcus, Enterobacter species, Acinetobacter species, non-aeruginosa species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus species, Alcaligenes species, diphtheroids, and Escherichia vulneris.
Research conducted in the 1980s showed that when magnesium is removed from culture media, certain species of staphylococci, including coagulase-negative staphylococci, will secrete increased levels of toxins.
Activity was tested against pathogens associated with CABP and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), such as Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA), coagulase-negative staphylococci, enterococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus viridians, beta-haemolytic streptococci, H.
Impact of rapid in-situ hybridization testing on coagulase-negative staphylococci positive blood cultures.
The pathogens identified in the study population included MRSA in 11 patients, VRE in 11, MSSA in 7, and coagulase-negative staphylococcus in 1; 1 other patient had an infection of unknown etiology.
14) Biel et al obtained sinus samples endoscopically during surgery and found that the most common bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci (36%), followed by S aureus, Streptococcus viridans, Corynebacterium species, and anaerobes.
Two-thirds of bacteremia were the result of gram-positive co cci, specifically coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n = 5) and MRSA (n = 1).