cofactor

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cofactor

 [ko´fak-ter]
an element or principle, e.g., a coenzyme, with which another must unite in order to function.
heparin cofactor II a member of the serpin group that inhibits thrombin.

co·fac·tor

(kō'fak'ter, tōr),
1. Synonym(s): coenzyme
2. An atom or molecule essential for the action of a large molecule, for example, heme in hemoglobin, magnesium in chlorophyll. Solo metal ions are regarded as cofactors for proteins, but not as coenzymes.

cofactor

/co·fac·tor/ (ko´fak-ter) an element or principle, e.g., a coenzyme, with which another must unite in order to function.
heparin cofactor II  a serine proteinase inhibitor of the serpin family that inhibits thrombin.

cofactor

(kō′făk′tər)
n.
1. One of two or more contributing factors.
2. A substance, such as a metallic ion or coenzyme, that must be associated with an enzyme for the enzyme to function.

co·fac·tor

(kō'fak'tŏr)
1. Synonym(s): coenzyme.
2. An atom or molecule essential for the action of a large molecule; e.g., heme in hemoglobin, magnesium in chlorophyll.

cofactor

a substance that is essential for the catalytic activity of some enzymes, binding to the enzyme only during the reaction. Cofactors can be metallic ions, or nonprotein organic molecules (coenzymes) such as vitamins in the B-COMPLEX.

co·fac·tor

(kō'fak'tŏr)
An atom or molecule essential for the action of a large molecule.

cofactor

an element or principle, e.g. a coenzyme, with which another must unite in order to function.

ristocetin cofactor
see ristocetin cofactor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reference cuvette contained all the same solutions in the same amount except for co-factor solution (0.
Sugiyama et al (1992, 1995): Choleakinesia is a co-factor for gall stone formation, Nippon.
Iron is an essential co-factor in the antioxidant enzyme catalase.
The response of our patients to the well intended interventions we apply depends on their stage of illness and adaptability, as well as on co-factors that determine therapeutic receptiveness and vulnerability.
Boulton sees little or no indication that tannin functions as a co-factor, or has much influence on the color of young red wines.
Populations in poverty are also characterized by malnutrition, parasite infection and lack of access to medical care and antibiotics for bacterial STDs, which are important co-factors for transmission of HIV.
He said: 'It may well have required a trigger, a co-factor which may well have been the prochlarperazine.
Had he attended the conference at the Uganda Martyrs University, he could have learned that poverty, with the inevitable consequences of poor diet, housing, sanitation and health care, is a major cause of immune deficiency without any need for HIV as a co-factor, with solutions that are too obvious to mention.
Mutual understanding is a necessary co-factor in reaching goals and objectives.
Most Americans fell short of getting the recommended 15 milligrams of daily zinc, an important mineral that serves a co-factor for hundreds of enzymes produced in the body, including digestive and antioxidant enzymes.
Urinary incontinence and subsequent conscious or covert deprivation of fluids is the most common non-drug co-factor in chronic constipation.
Assays for the evaluation of HIV-1 integrase enzymatic activity, DNA-binding and co-factor interaction