Cnidaria

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Cnidaria

 [ni-dar´e-ah]
a phylum of marine invertebrates that includes sea anemones, hydras, jellyfish, and corals. See also coelenterata.

Cnidaria

/Cni·da·ria/ (ni-dar´e-ah) a phylum of marine invertebrates including sea anemones, hydras, corals, jellyfish, and comb jellies, characterized by a radially symmetric body bearing tentacles around the mouth.

Cnidaria

a phylum of invertebrate animals that includes jellyfish, sea anemones, hydroids, and corals. Formerly called Coelenterata.

Cnidaria

a subphylum of the phylum Coelenterata in some classifications, where the Ctenophora (sea gooseberries) form the other subphylum (see COELENTERATE). However, in more modern classifications the Ctenophora are given the status of a phylum, so that the organisms classified in the Cnidaria (hydroids, jellyfishes, sea anemones and corals) are the only organisms in the new phylum Coelenterata, thus making the term Cnidaria obsolete.

Cnidaria

a phylum of lowly animals including hydroids and hydromedusae (class Hydrozoa), true jellyfish and free-swimming medusae (class Scyphozoa) and sea anemones, sea pens and corals (class Anthozoa). Previously called Coelenterata and that name is still widely used.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mollusks make up the same percent of marine life as fish and cnidarians combined.
In this project, we are developing molecular markers to identify various cnidarian groups.
Cnidarians have been around for over 600 million years.
Some cnidarians, sponges, polyclads, and molluscs take advantage of the symbiosis in acquiring a considerable part of their necessary carbon (Edmunds & Davies 1986, Klumpp & Griffiths 1994, Hawkins & Klumpp 1995, Venn et al.
His research has shown these cnidarians tend to fall into two categories-those that produce faster, harder strokes and those that create weaker but more efficient strokes.
1992) and the related hyolithelminth Torellella (Vinn 2006c) have been interpreted as cnidarians on the basis of their tube structure.
Like jellyfish, most Cnidarians have a tubular body with a mouth on one end surrounded by tentacles.
Like all cnidarians (ny-DARE-ee-uhnz), a group of organisms that includes jellyfish and sea anemones, corals have stinging tentacles arranged in a circle around their mouths.
A total of 78 different species were found throughout this study, including polychaete worms (28 species), bivalves (11 species), amphipods (10 species), crabs (7 species), fishes (6 species), shrimps (2 species), cnidarians (1 species), and isopods (1 species).
The stinging cells, or cnidocysts, of sea anemones, jellyfish and other cnidarians contain a coiled hollow thread that unravels rapidly when triggered by physical contact.