clue cell


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Related to clue cell: parabasal cell

clue cell

a type of vaginal epithelial cell that appears granular and is coated with coccobacillary organisms; seen in bacterial vaginosis.
A superficial squamous cell with peripheral clumps of gram-negative Gardnerella vaginalis, which imparts a stippled, granular appearance on a ‘wet mount’ of a cervical smear
Treatment Metronidazole

clue cell

(klū sel)
A type of vaginal epithelial cell that appears granular and is coated with coccobacillary organisms; seen in bacterial vaginosis.

clue cell

A vaginal epithelial cell, thickly coated with coccobacillary organisms. Clue cells are a hallmark of bacterial vaginosis.
See also: cell
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinicians must first consider whether each individual pathogen is present, in addition to then noting the presence of clue cells, leukocytes, and lactobacilli.
The bacteria adhere so well to the epithelial cells that cellular detail of clue cells is often obscured by the bacterial matting on the cell surface, with unclear cellular edges and even indistinct nuclui.
5 53 94 Odor on 94 93 alkalinization Clue cells on 90 99 wet mount Source: Thomason et al 1990.
97 Clue cells present ([greater than]20%/high power field) 0.
Clue cells were identified and demonstrated in 39 women in the study group and in the control group only in 15 women.
Clinical treatment failure was defined as the persistence of two of the following: clue cells, a creamy adherent vaginal discharge, pH greater than 4.
A Clue cells are squamous epithelial cells (SEC) of the vagina that are coated with small rods such that the cell borders are obliterated.
Presence of clue cells (usually representing at least 20% of vaginal epithelial cells).
Donders and his associates found that 6% of patients had bacterial vaginosis, on the basis of vaginal smears that were deficient in lactobacilli and positive for clue cells.
G vaginalis has been shown to be increased in patients with findings of a gray or homogenous discharge, [2] in those with a positive amine test [3,4] or vaginal odor, [5] in those with discharge of high pH [2-4] or discharge containing clue cells, [3,4,6,7] in those using nonbarrier contraceptive methods, [3,8,9] in those with multiple sexual partners, [3,9] and in those with other sexually transmitted diseases such as T vaginalis.