Clostridium chauvoei


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Related to Clostridium chauvoei: Clostridium feseri

Clos·trid·i·um chau·voe·'i

a bacterial species that affects cattle and sheep causing blackleg (black quarter) and bighead which produces an exotoxin.

Clostridium chauvoei

The organism causing blackleg or symptomatic anthrax in cattle.
See also: Clostridium

Clostridium

a genus of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria of the family Bacillaceae. Most are gram-positive rods.

Clostridium bifermentans, Clostridium sordelli
see malignant edema.
Clostridium botulinum
causes botulism from neurotoxin produced during vegetative growth. C. botulinum types B, C and D are associated with disease in animals but the type prevalence varies geographically. See botulism.
Clostridium butyricum
involved in the spoilage of meat.
Clostridium cadaveris
may be associated with colitis X in horses.
Clostridium chauvoei
formerly called C. feseri. See blackleg.
Clostridium colinum
cause of ulcerative enteritis and liver necrosis in quail, turkeys, grouse, partridge and chickens. Not an accredited species.
Clostridium difficile
see antibiotic-associated colitis.
Clostridium feseri
now called C. chauvoei (above).
Clostridium haemolyticum
formerly called C. novyi type D. See bacillary hemoglobinuria.
Clostridium histolyticum
a species found in feces, soil and sometimes wound infections. An important cause of meat spoilage.
Clostridium nigrificans
a thermophilic spoiler of canned meat producing hydrogen sulfide gas and causing purple staining of the inside of the can. Now called Desulfotomaculum nigrificans.
Clostridium novyi
see infectious necrotic hepatitis. See also C. haemolyticum (above). Previously called C. oedematiens. Type A causes malignant edema in cattle and sheep, and big head in rams, type B causes infectious necrotic hepatitis (black disease), and type C has been associated with osteomyelitis in buffalo.
Clostridium overgrowth
see bacterial overgrowth.
Clostridium parabotulinum
a proteolytic subgroup of C. botulinum; not a valid species.
Clostridium perfringens
cause of enterotoxemia. Type A causes malignant edema, type B causes dysentery in lambs and enterotoxemia, type C causes struck in sheep and necrotic enteritis in piglets, type D causes enterotoxemia and type E causes necrotic enteritis. Previously called C. welchii.
Clostridium putrefaciens
causes deep bone taint in hams. See also C. putrificum (below).
Clostridium putrificum
a cause of bone taint in cured hams. There is no detectable abnormality on the surface of the ham.
Clostridium septicum
formerly called C. septique. See malignant edema, braxy.
Clostridium sordelli
cause of a small proportion of cases of gas gangrene in ruminants. See also abomasitis.
Clostridium spiroforme
associated with enteritis and enterocolitis in rabbits, guinea pigs and foals.
Clostridium sporogenes
an apathogenic clostridium often found in lesions of gas gangrene.
Clostridium tetani
a common inhabitant of soil and human and horse intestines, and the cause of tetanus in humans and domestic animals.
Clostridium villosum
found in fight abscesses and pleurisy in cats.
Clostridium welchii
see C. perfringens (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 21 samples (Emphysematous exudates and muscle piece) from cattle and buffaloes suspected for black quarter were collected aseptically and were processed for isolation and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by molecular and traditional method.
A positive control of known vaccine standard strain of Clostridium chauvoei was used.
Study area: A total of (n=750) swab and (n=50) tissue samples of cattle suspected for blackleg reported in six districts (please provide details) of Punjab Pakistan were collected aseptically placed in ice bags and transported to Department of Pathology University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences Lahore (Pakistan) for the isolation and identification of Clostridium chauvoei.
Primers used for the identification of Clostridium chauvoei
Outbreak of intestinal and lingual Clostridium chauvoei infection in two-year-old Friesian heifers.
Pathological changes in the pericardium and meninges of cattle associated with Clostridium chauvoei.

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