Clostridium


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Related to Clostridium: clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium butyricum

Clostridium

 [klo-strid´e-um]
a genus of gram-positive, obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria. Several species cause gas gangrene, including C. bifermen´tans, C. histioly´ticum, C. no´vyi, C. perfrin´gens (the most common cause), and C. sep´ticum. Other species are C. botuli´num, the cause of botulism; C. diffi´cile, the cause of antibiotic-associated colitis; and C. te´tani, the cause of tetanus.

clostridium

 [klo-strid´e-um] (pl. clostri´dia) (L.)
any individual of the genus Clostridium.

Clostridium

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm),
A genus of anaerobic (or anaerobic, aerotolerant), spore-forming, motile (occasionally nonmotile) bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods; motile cells are peritrichous. Many species are saccharolytic and fermentative, producing various acids and gases and variable amounts of neutral products; other species are proteolytic, some attacking proteins with putrefaction or more complete proteolysis. Some species fix free nitrogen. These organisms sometimes produce exotoxins; they are generally found in soil and in the mammalian intestinal tract, where they may cause disease. The type species is Clostridium butyricum.
[G. klōstēr, a spindle]

clos·trid·i·um

, pl.

clos·trid·i·a

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm, -ă),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Clostridium.

Clostridium

/Clos·trid·i·um/ (klos-trid´e-um) a genus of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria (family Bacillaceae).
Clostridium bifermen´tans  a species common in feces, sewage, and soil and associated with gas gangrene.
Clostridium botuli´num  the causative agent of botulism, divided into six types (A through F) which elaborate immunologically distinct toxins.
Clostridium diffi´cile  a species often occurring transiently in the gut of infants, but whose toxin causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis in those receiving prolonged antibiotic therapy.
Clostridium histoly´ticum  a species found in feces and soil.
Clostridium kluy´veri  a species used in the study of both microbial synthesis and microbial oxidation of fatty acids.
Clostridium no´vyi  an important cause of gas gangrene.
Clostridium oedema´tiens  C. novyi.
Clostridium perfrin´gens  the most common etiologic agent of gas gangrene, distinguishable as several different types; type A causes human gas gangrene, colitis, and food poisoning and type C causes enteritis.
Clostridium ramo´sum  a species found in human and animal infections and feces and commonly isolated from clinical specimens.
Clostridium sporo´genes  a species widespread in nature, reportedly associated with pathogenic anaerobes in gangrenous infections.
Clostridium ter´tium  a species found in feces, sewage, and soil and present in some gangrenous infections.
Clostridium te´tani  a common inhabitant of soil and human and horse intestines, and the cause of tetanus in humans and domestic animals.
Clostridium wel´chii  British name for C. perfringens.

clostridium

/clos·trid·i·um/ (klos-trid´e-um) pl. clostri´dia   an individual of the genus Clostridium. clostrid´ial

clostridium

(klŏ-strĭd′ē-əm)
n. pl. clostrid·ia (-ē-ə)
Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, chiefly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, such as certain nitrogen-fixing species found in soil and those causing botulism and tetanus.

clos·trid′i·al (-əl) adj.

Clostridium

[-ē·əm]
Etymology: Gk, kloster, spindle
a genus of spore-forming anaerobic bacteria of the Bacillaceae family: Clostridium novyi, C. septicum, and C. bifermentans are involved in gas gangrene; C. botulinum causes botulism and produces the toxin Botox used in some cosmetic procedures; C. perfringens causes food poisoning, cellulitis, and wound infections; C. tetani is the cause of tetanus.

Clos·trid·i·um

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm)
A genus of anaerobic (or anaerobic, aerotolerant), spore-forming, motile (occasionally nonmotile) bacteria containing gram-positive rods. Exotoxins are sometimes produced by these organisms. They may cause disease in humans and other animals. They are generally found in soil and in the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. The type species is C. butyricum.

clos·trid·i·um

, pl. clostridia (klos-trid'ē-ŭm, -ă)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Clostridium.

Clostridium,

Any bacterium of the genus Clostridium . These are rod shaped and spore-forming and mostly able to reproduce in the absence of free oxygen (anaerobic). The genus includes Clostridium welchii which causes gas gangrene, Clostridium tetani which causes TETANUS and Clostridium botulinum which causes BOTULISM.

Clostridium

A genus of deadly bacteria that are responsible for tetanus and other serious diseases, including botulism and gangrene from war wounds. Clostridia thrives without oxygen.
Mentioned in: Tetanus
Clostridium genus of anaerobic, spore-forming, Gram-positive soil bacteria that produce powerful neurotoxins, causing tissue necrosis
  • C. botulinum causative organism of botulism; its neurotoxin causes muscle paralysis; its derivative (Botox) is used to reduce muscle spasm characteristic of upper motor neurone lesions

  • C. difficile a so-called 'hospital superbug', carried by 1:20 healthy asymptomatic adults, but causing pseudomembranous colitis, especially in the frail and elderly who are, or who have recently been, on broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy

  • C. perfringens (C. welchii), C. novyi, C. septicum causing painful anaerobic infections of lacerated wounds in association with fracture or retained foreign body, especially in ischaemic tissues, leading to severe tissue induration, pulselessness and gas gangrene

  • C. tetani the causative organism of tetanus

Clos·trid·i·um

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm)
Genus of anaerobic, spore-forming, motile bacteria that may cause disease in intestinal tract.

Clostridium

a genus of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria of the family Bacillaceae. Most are gram-positive rods.

Clostridium bifermentans, Clostridium sordelli
see malignant edema.
Clostridium botulinum
causes botulism from neurotoxin produced during vegetative growth. C. botulinum types B, C and D are associated with disease in animals but the type prevalence varies geographically. See botulism.
Clostridium butyricum
involved in the spoilage of meat.
Clostridium cadaveris
may be associated with colitis X in horses.
Clostridium chauvoei
formerly called C. feseri. See blackleg.
Clostridium colinum
cause of ulcerative enteritis and liver necrosis in quail, turkeys, grouse, partridge and chickens. Not an accredited species.
Clostridium difficile
see antibiotic-associated colitis.
Clostridium feseri
now called C. chauvoei (above).
Clostridium haemolyticum
formerly called C. novyi type D. See bacillary hemoglobinuria.
Clostridium histolyticum
a species found in feces, soil and sometimes wound infections. An important cause of meat spoilage.
Clostridium nigrificans
a thermophilic spoiler of canned meat producing hydrogen sulfide gas and causing purple staining of the inside of the can. Now called Desulfotomaculum nigrificans.
Clostridium novyi
see infectious necrotic hepatitis. See also C. haemolyticum (above). Previously called C. oedematiens. Type A causes malignant edema in cattle and sheep, and big head in rams, type B causes infectious necrotic hepatitis (black disease), and type C has been associated with osteomyelitis in buffalo.
Clostridium overgrowth
see bacterial overgrowth.
Clostridium parabotulinum
a proteolytic subgroup of C. botulinum; not a valid species.
Clostridium perfringens
cause of enterotoxemia. Type A causes malignant edema, type B causes dysentery in lambs and enterotoxemia, type C causes struck in sheep and necrotic enteritis in piglets, type D causes enterotoxemia and type E causes necrotic enteritis. Previously called C. welchii.
Clostridium putrefaciens
causes deep bone taint in hams. See also C. putrificum (below).
Clostridium putrificum
a cause of bone taint in cured hams. There is no detectable abnormality on the surface of the ham.
Clostridium septicum
formerly called C. septique. See malignant edema, braxy.
Clostridium sordelli
cause of a small proportion of cases of gas gangrene in ruminants. See also abomasitis.
Clostridium spiroforme
associated with enteritis and enterocolitis in rabbits, guinea pigs and foals.
Clostridium sporogenes
an apathogenic clostridium often found in lesions of gas gangrene.
Clostridium tetani
a common inhabitant of soil and human and horse intestines, and the cause of tetanus in humans and domestic animals.
Clostridium villosum
found in fight abscesses and pleurisy in cats.
Clostridium welchii
see C. perfringens (above).

clostridium

pl. clostridia [Gr.] any individual of the genus Clostridium.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three main factors which are concerned about this pathogen are: the increased infection diagnosis of Clostridium difficil in the general population, recent studies that have identified Clostridium difficil in foods of animal origin, and Clostridium difficil isolation from food patients who have the history of 5 previous month's hospitalization.
The latest test results tally with Fonterra's own initial testing, which pointed to clostridium sporogenes.
Emergence of Clostridium difficile infection due to a new hypervirulent strain, polymerase chain reaction ribotype 078.
Kuijper EJ, Coignard B, Tull P; ESCMID Study Group for Clostridium difficile; EU Member States; European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.
Commission for Healthcare Audit and Inspection--Investigation into outbreaks of Clostridium difficile at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Buckinghamshire Hospitals NHS Trust, 2006.
It is thought that Clostridium perfringens sepsis presents in three different modes - simple contamination, clostridial crepitant cellulitis and finally as gas gangrene.
Characterization and detection of Clostridium botulinum and their toxins
Risk factors for Clostridium difficile carriage and C.
Overuse of antibiotics leads to the decrease in the patient's intestinal normal flora, allowing the already present Clostridium difficile to adhere to the mucosa of the patient's intestine.
The formulation, made up of two collagenases produced by the bacterium Clostridium histolyticurn, is injected into the cord at 4-week intervals, for a maximum of three injections, according to the manufacturer, Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Clostridium difficile has become a significant hospital-acquired pathogen, causing up to 25% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea among inpatients.
Tricia Hart, director of nursing and patient safety, said: "We have continued to make excellent progress on the reduction of MRSA and Clostridium difficile.