clinic

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clinic

 [klin´ik]
1. an establishment where patients are admitted for special study and treatment by a group of health care professionals practicing together.
2. a clinical lecture; examination of patients before a class of students; instruction at the bedside.
satellite clinic a facility owned by a hospital but operated at a distant site.
walk-in clinic a facility that offers health care services without an appointment.

clin·ic

(klin'ik),
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G. klinē, bed]

clinic

/clin·ic/ (klin´ik)
1. a clinical lecture; examination of patients before a class of students; instruction at the bedside.
2. an establishment where patients are admitted for study and treatment by a group of physicians practicing medicine together.

ambulant clinic  one for patients not confined to the bed.
dry clinic  a clinical lecture with case histories, but without patients present.

clinic

(klĭn′ĭk)
n.
1. A facility, often associated with a hospital or medical school, that is devoted to the diagnosis and care of outpatients.
2. A medical establishment run by several specialists working in cooperation and sharing the same facilities.
3.
a. A seminar or meeting of physicians and medical students in which medical instruction is conducted in the presence of the patient, as at the bedside.
b. A place where such instruction occurs.
c. A class or lecture of medical instruction conducted in this manner.

clinic

Etymology: Gk, kline, bed
1 an ambulatory care site where persons who do not require hospitalization receive medical care.
2 a group practice of doctors, such as the Mayo Clinic.
3 a meeting place for doctors, nurses, and medical students where instruction can be given at the bedside of a patient or in a similar setting.
4 a seminar or other scientific medical meeting.
5 a detailed published report of the diagnosis and treatment of a health care problem.

clinic

Graduate education
A lecture in which a patient is present; instruction of students at the bedside; rarely used in the US.

Medspeak
A place where patients are seen on an outpatient basis, either as a first-time visit, or as a follow-up to some form of previous evaluation or therapy.
 
Medspeak-UK
A schedule of appointments normally held on a regular basis at a particular place—usually on hospital premises, including outpatient department or inpatient ward, or offsite in a health centre. Patients are booked to attend clinics, usually with a consultant or his/her team, for consultation, evaluation, treatment, education or counseling.

Psychiatry
A place where patients are treated for a specific kind of disorder, either medical or mental (often understood to be the latter), particularly with reference to substance abuse.

clinic

Medical practice A site where Pts are seen on an outpatient basis, either as a first-time visit, or as a follow-up to some form of previous evaluation or therapy. See Ambulatory care, Betty Ford Clinic, Free clinic, Pain clinic, University health clinic Psychiatry A place where Pts are treated for a specific kind of disorder; either medical or mental.

clin·ic

(klin'ik)
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G. klinē, bed]

clinic

1. A medical institution in which a number of specialists work in association, usually dealing with outpatients.
2. A training session in practical medicine for medical students.

clin·ic

(klin'ik)
1. An institution, building, or part of a building where ambulatory patients receive health care.
2. An institution, building, or part of a building in which medical instruction is given to students by means of demonstrations in the presence of the sick.
3. A lecture or symposium on a subject relating to disease.
[G.klinē, bed]

clinic

1. historically—a clinical lecture; examination of patients before a class of students; instruction at the bedside.
2. classically—an establishment where patients are admitted for special study and treatment by a group of physicians practicing medicine together.
3. realistically—is used in most veterinary contexts to describe an establishment conducted by a veterinarian at which patients are examined and treated as outpatients, in contrast to a hospital where patients are admitted for treatment.

Patient discussion about clinic

Q. Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question? Can acupuncture help reduce the pain in fibromyalgia? Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question?

A. Yes, acupuncture therapy can reduce the fatigue, widespread pain and sleep problems associated with fibromyalgia. If acupuncture can be used in place of pain reliever then its good as the side effect associated with pain relievers are reduced.

Q. I want to know what causes clinical depression? My friend is diagnosed with clinical depression. He is showing signs for the past six months. We found this when he lost interest in music which was his soul before. He lost interest in all other activities including hang out with us. We were wondering what could be the reason for the drastic change in his behavior. Very recently he stopped attending school also. We have tried to contact him but in vain. Then we got to know from his brother that he feels very low and depressed and is diagnosed with clinical depression? I want to know what causes clinical depression?

A. Any neurotransmitters imbalance in the brain can cause the mood to go down. This makes the person depressed. This can happen due to genetic impact. The social or financial difficulty can cause the disturbances in neurotransmitters, which causes depression in a person. Try to know from him whether he has any history of failures which he is hiding within him. Try to know the exact cause of depression. Depression, if left unattended, could develop in to Bipolar Disorder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BloACoqVs1o&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vBloACoqVs1o_cathy_tells_ppd_postpartum_depression_story?q=post%20partum%20depr&feature=player_embedded

Q. What's the difference between clinical depression that needs treating, and just regularly being depressed? I'm often depressed, and i just wondered what the difference is between just being depressed, and clinical? At what point does depression become depression?

A. It depends on the duration of the episodes, the frequency and severity. Even psychiatrists have trouble to pinpoint it. They often disagree on the “borderly” cases, here is some info on the diagnose of depression:
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/35222/362840.html?d=dmtContent

More discussions about clinic
References in periodicals archive ?
Thank God for this clinic,'' patient Maria Guzman said Monday.
The 11 dental clinics of Heidelberg Dental Activity conducted several DARW activities hosting breakfasts and luncheons throughout the week and climaxing with the assembling of all the more than 115 D.
The analyses included 635 patients who had a baseline CD4 cell count on March 1, 2000, and at least one clinic visit or hospitalization later in the study period; half were followed up for at least seven months.
Today, the board appears not only to approve of it but wants to open clinics in every school, where the material can be more actively promoted by full-time public health nurses--without parents getting in the way, of course.
In each outbreak discussed, the veterinary facility or animal shelter was the only common exposure for infected persons, which demonstrated that infected animals brought to companion animal veterinary clinics and animal shelters can be foci for nosocomial transmission to other animals and for zoonotic transmission to humans.
That means its clinic space at 380 Second Avenue is now on the market with Earle Altman of Helmsley-Spear, who says it will provide an unusual opportunity for one of the local hospitals to slip into an 18,000 square-foot space already built out for clinic use.
Live client tax clinics help to meet the needs of students, employers and the community at-large.
The court's order also prohibited Marshfield Clinic and its HMO from discriminating against Blue Cross and its HMO in providing them access to Marshfield physicians, products, and services for the purpose of establishing an HMO in the area.
If the anti-abortion forces can be out in force, blockading clinics in sub-zero weather and scorching heat, so can we.
After anti-abortion demonstrators shut down clinics in Wichita, Kansas, in the summer of 1991, Operation Rescue met its match in the streets of Buffalo, New York.
The clinic is also the winner of this year's Northern Ontario Business Award for Company of the Year (26 to 50 employees), sponsored by Canadian Partner.