medical technologist

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medical

 [med´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to medicine or to the treatment of diseases; pertaining to medicine as opposed to surgery.
medical assistant a person who, under the direction of a qualified physician, performs a variety of routine administrative and clinical tasks in a physician's office, a hospital, or some other clinical facility.
medical laboratory technician (MLT) see clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician.
medical record administrator one responsible for the indexing, recording, and storage of medical records and reports of patients admitted to hospitals and other health care agencies, and who also prepares reports of births, deaths, transfers, and discharges of patients, and of treatments received.

There are two levels of qualification for the medical record practitioner: Registered Record Administrator (RRA) and Accredited Record Technician (ART). Only those persons who have passed the registration examination of the american health information management association are entitled to use the professional designation of Registered Record Administrator or the job titles of medical record administrator and health record administrator. Only individuals who have passed the accreditation examination of the Association are entitled to use the designation of Accredited Record Technician. Suitable job titles for the RRA might include: Medical Record Administrator; Director, Medical Record Administration Program; Director, Medical Record Services; Instructor; Coordinator; and Research Associate. Suitable job titles for the ART might include: Medical Record Technician; Director; Assistant Director; Supervisor; and Instructor.

medical technologist

medical technologist

A lab worker in the US who has received at least 4 years of formal college or university education (e.g., a bachelor of science degree in medical technology) and training in various techniques in clinical pathology, haematology, microbiology, chemistry, blood banking, immunology, and other areas of the lab.

medical

1. pertaining to or emanating from the study or discipline of medicine, in the context of veterinary science in veterinary medicine.
2. a class of diseases that are traditionally treated by medicines rather than by surgery.

medical ecology
study of the environment and its relationship to a population of animals with respect to the effect of the environment on the diseases of the animals.
problem-oriented medical record
a standardized format for keeping clinical records in a problem-oriented case management system. An early decision is made on what is the nature of the patient's problem or problems and from then on the patient's status with respect to each problem is assessed daily. This has the undeniable advantage that the clinician does not lose sight of the objective with respect to the individual patient. Without this approach there is always an inclination for the clinician to attack the disease and place the patient on a lower priority. The attitude adopted as a result of this approach is very similar to the herd health approach in herd medicine—the objective is the farmer's survival, not the eradication of some bacteria.
medical records
the detailed records, made at the time, of the clinical, clinical pathology and pathology examinations and treatments of each patient, or patient group. The records have importance to the welfare of the patient, and to potential medical research and legal investigations, and to be worth their full value they must be made contemporaneously.
medical technologist
a qualified worker in a paramedical field such as laboratory scientist, veterinary nurse or livestock inspector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brunstein was part of UBC's Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine as a Clinical Assistant Professor and a Clinical Lab Scientist in the Microbiology/ Virology laboratory of the Children's and Women's Health Centre of BC.
Glen McDaniel, MS, MBA, MT, CLS, CLDIR, is a healthcare consultant, clinical lab scientist, speaker and freelance writer.
Trustees Cindy Vinson, 54, a retired clinical lab scientist, and Robert Kahn, 73, a retired sales director, are seeking re-election.
They plan to demolish fifty-one homes to put up a parking lot, the new traffic created will bring horrible gridlock at intersections I use everyday and the combined pollution from the traffic and construction will amount to eighty tons more air pollution that we will have to breathe if we want to live in Long Beach," said Virginia Culp, Long Beach resident, Clinical Lab Scientist, and member of SEIU-UHW.
As a clinical lab scientist with well over 40 years of experience, having not only performed many venipunctures and capillary punctures [but also] having instructed many phlebotomists, I am livid at the thought that one could [have] performed such procedures with only telephonic instructions.
More than 100 UCSF physicians, nurses, clinical lab scientists, respiratory therapists and health safety workers have volunteered to provide care.
A report from the California Hospital Association found that 844 clinical lab scientists will be eligible for retirement by 2015, but the state graduates only about 125 CLS students per year.
The shortage of clinical lab scientists is a serious problem, and the stakes are high.
The demand for degreed clinical lab scientists simply is not being met by the current supply sources," said McMillan.
For the 40 clinical lab scientists and six pathologists who staff the lab at the 180-bed Kaiser Permanente Hospital (Hayward, CA) four microscopes are in the lab--one fitted with a camera.
We have held a series of HAI workshops over the past year, bringing together leading researchers and clinicians with clinical lab scientists in California, Indiana, and New York.

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