climatology

(redirected from Climatologists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Climatologists: climatological

cli·ma·tol·o·gy

(klī'mă-tol'ō-jē),
The study of climate.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These climatologists say there's self-serving deception going on here and that the consequences could be inadequate action curtailing a wide variety of horrors.
It's quite possible even Rick Perry didn't know we had a state climatologist," he told an Austin audience recently, to chuckles.
Climate-change skeptics dispute such statistical arguments, contending that climatologists don't know enough about long-range patterns to draw definitive links between global warming and weather extremes.
Over the last six years, we've extracted more groundwater from California than is stored in Lake Mead," said Doug Fischer, a climatologist at California State University, Northridge, referring to the country's largest reservoir.
Jim White of Instaar says today's climatologists are fighting major interests such as the oil and gas industries in much the same way physicians were fighting the tobacco lobby in the 1960s.
When skeptics do cite a research paper that predicted the possibility of global cooling, it is almost invariably a 1971 article in Science coauthored by Stanford University climatologist Stephen Schneider, then a graduate student at Columbia University.
Some climatologists were so concerned about global cooling and advancing ice that they believed governments needed to intervene to combat the trend.
In a test of both USNA computer models during the report's review process, University of Virginia climatologist Patrick Michaels (one of the skeptics attacked in Boiling Point) and his colleagues found the simulations of past U.
Climatologist Wolf Read, a colleague of Taylor's at Oregon State University's Oregon Climate Center, is predicting a "very real possibility" of snow and frigid temperatures in the Willamette Valley, perhaps in December, along with stormy conditions in November and March.
A unique observational instrument called MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) now allows climatologists to study how aerosols move across the planet.
This data is then compared to historical measurements and climatologists can make a decision on what may be a one-off flooding and what may be caused by climate change.