climate

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Related to Climates: Temperate climates, Tropical climates

climate

[klī′mit]
Etymology: Gk, klima, inclination
1 a composite of the prevailing weather conditions that characterize any particular geographic region, including air pressure, temperature, precipitation, sunshine, and humidity. Because these factors affect health, they must be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of certain illnesses, especially those affecting respiration.
2 the general condition surrounding something, as in a climate of goodwill. climatic, adj.

climate

the general meteorological conditions prevailing in a given area.

climate

the total environmental effect of ambient temperature, barometric pressure, radiation, oxygen concentration, water precipitation, humidity, wind speed, wind direction and sunlight hours or cloud cover. Called also weather.

climate classes
includes tropical, semitropical, desert, arid, semiarid, temperate, subarctic, arctic, polar.
climate envelope
the range of climatic variation in which a species can persist in the face of competitors, predators and disease.
climate impact
includes overall statements of total effect of climate such as wind-chill index, temperature-humidity index, effective temperature.

Patient discussion about climate

Q. If you are an asthmatic, is it better to live in a cold climate or hot climate?

A. Well, I'm not a doctor and I guess you should consult one cause each patient can get allergic asthma from different things but as an asthmatic I can tell you it's not necessarily has to do with cold/warm tough humidity and haziness are definitely important factors for some of us. I tend to get more attacks in places with these factors and in my country, the city which is considered with the "best air" for asthmatics has a dry and cold weather...

More discussions about climate
References in classic literature ?
We never cared any thing about ice-cream at home, but we look upon it with a sort of idolatry now that it is so scarce in these red-hot climates of the East.
He does not stand out of our low limitations, like a Chimborazo under the line, running up from the torrid Base through all the climates of the globe, with belts of the herbage of every latitude on its high and mottled sides; but this genius is the landscape-garden of a modern house, adorned with fountains and statues, with well-bred men and women standing and sitting in the walks and terraces.
Notwithstanding fatigues of every description, and in all climates, Ferguson's constitution continued marvellously sound.
Tall and burly, with features and skin hardened by exposure to the sun and winds of many climates, he looked like a man ready to face all hardships, equal to any emergency.
Seasoned to all climates and all fatigues--a strong fellow, a brave fellow, a clever fellow--in short, an excellent officer.
There is a foolish idea in the minds of many persons that the natives of the warm climates are imaginative people.
And for fear that the idea may still lurk in some minds that my preceding years of drinking were the cause of my disabilities, I here point out that my Japanese cabin boy, Nakata, still with me, was rotten with fever, as was Charmian, who in addition was in the slough of a tropical neurasthenia that required several years of temperate climates to cure, and that neither she nor Nakata drank or ever had drunk.
If I were to attempt to sum up the thousands of letters, from all sorts of people in all sorts of latitudes and climates, which this unlucky paragraph brought down upon me, I should get into an arithmetical difficulty from which I could not easily extricate myself.
Keeping ever close by the work of excavation, he busied himself incessantly with the welfare and health of his workpeople, and was singularly fortunate in warding off the epidemics common to large communities of men, and so disastrous in those regions of the globe which are exposed to the influences of tropical climates.
When we reflect on the vast diversity of the plants and animals which have been cultivated, and which have varied during all ages under the most different climates and treatment, I think we are driven to conclude that this greater variability is simply due to our domestic productions having been raised under conditions of life not so uniform as, and somewhat different from, those to which the parent-species have been exposed under nature.
In England any person fond of natural history enjoys in his walks a great advantage, by always having something to attract his attention; but in these fertile climates, teeming with life, the attractions are so numerous, that he is scarcely able to walk at all.
But as it happens that not one stroke can labor lay to without some new acquaintance with nature, and as nature is inexhaustibly significant, the inhabitants of these climates have always excelled the southerner in force.

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