clavicle

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Related to Clavicles: collarbone, Glutes

clavicle

 [klav´ĭ-k'l]
an elongated, slender, curved bone lying horizontally at the root of the neck, in the upper part of the thorax; called also collar bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices. adj., adj clavic´ular.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl), [TA] Avoid the misspelling clavical.
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint, its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA], collar bone

clavicle

/clav·i·cle/ (klav´ĭ-k'l) collar bone; a bone, curved like the letter f, that articulates with the sternum and scapula, forming the anterior portion of the shoulder girdle on either side.clavic´ular

clavicle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.

clavicle

[klav′ikəl]
Etymology: L, clavicula, little key
a long curved, horizontal bone directly above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the acromion of the scapula and accommodates the attachment of numerous muscles. It is shorter, thinner, less curved, and smoother in the female than in the male and is thicker, more curved, and more prominently ridged for muscle attachment in persons performing consistent strenuous manual labor. Also called collarbone (informal).

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle. Its medial end articulates with the manubrium sterni at the sternoclavicular joint; its lateral end with the acromion of the scapula at the acromioclavicular joint.
Synonym(s): clavicula [TA] , collar bone.

clavicle

The collar-bone, which runs from the upper and outer corner of the breastbone (sternum) to connect to a process on the outer side of the shoulder-blade (scapula).
Clavicleclick for a larger image
Fig. 108 Clavicle . Location on left side of a primate.

clavicle

a bone associated with the ventral side of the shoulder girdle on each side of many vertebrates. In humans it is the collar bone.
Figure 1: The nervous system.

clavicle

the collar bone. Can be fractured in contact sports or with a fall on the outstretched arm. Figure 1.

clav·i·cle

(klav'i-kĕl) [TA]
A doubly curved long bone that forms part of the shoulder girdle.
Synonym(s): collar bone.

clavicle (klav´ikəl),

n a long, curved, horizontal bone just above the first rib, forming the ventral portion of the shoulder girdle. It articulates medially with the sternum and laterally with the scapula.

clavicle

the collar bone; reduced or absent from many domestic animals but present in animals that can grasp with their forelimbs such as the cat and primates. See also clavicular intersection.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of acute midshaft clavicle fractures: systematic review of 2144 fractures: on behalf of the Evidence-Based Orthopaedic Trauma Working Group.
Clavicle fractures continue to be a common injury encountered by the orthopaedic surgeon and have received much attention recently.
Closed treatment of displaced middle-third fractures of the clavicle gives poor results.
More recently, a multicenter randomized clinical trial comparing nonoperative treatment with plate fixation of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures was performed.
Bone marrow edema in the distal clavicle is the most common manifestation of this disease.
In a sense, continued physical activity and pathogenesis will result in a "self-surgery"; that is, the clavicle will be resected on its own.
In 1994, Slawski and Cahill published a paper analyzing the efficacy of an open distal clavicle resection on patients suffering from distal clavicle osteolysis.
Classically, the amount of distal clavicle and acromion resected combined has been 1 to 2 cm; this is most commonly referred to as the Mumford procedure.
Due to her asymptomatic state, she was followed clinically with the tentative diagnosis of a degenerative condition of the medial clavicle.
Examination revealed a firm, nontender swelling that extended laterally approximately 4 centimeters from the sternoclavicular joint and appeared associated with the clavicle.
X-rays demonstrated slight expansion of the medial end of the clavicle and no periosteal reaction or cortical erosions (Fig.
Examination revealed a firm, nontender mass over the proximal clavicle.