Civil Contingencies Act 2004

(redirected from Civil Contingencies Bill)

Civil Contingencies Act 2004

An Act of Parliament which provides the framework for emergency and disaster planning and response on local and national levels in the UK, replacing the Civil Defence Act (1948), which was ill-equipped for domestic squabbles related to fuel, flooding and foot and mouth disease and serious emergencies such as terrorism.

The Act is divided into three parts—Part 1, which defines local arrangements for civil protection, is of particular medical interest. Part 1 lists core (category 1) responders: “blue light” services—emergency medical services, police, fire, coast guard, primary care trusts, acute trusts, foundation trusts, health protection agency, port health authorities, local authorities and environment agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following his service in the MOD, Lord Moonie was chairman of a pre-legislative committee of both the House of Commons and House of Lords which scrutinized the draft Civil Contingencies Bill.
THE Civil Contingencies Bill now being put forward by the Govern-ment is the most frightening legislation ever put before Parliament.
Under the Civil Contingencies Bill, armed officers - backed up by soldiers - will be able to bar the public from sensitive sites, requisition property, ban public meetings and set up courts to deal with dissenters.
Mr Macho, Cardiff and the Vale of Glamorgan's principal emergency planning officer, said the Civil Contingencies Bill, which is due to go before Parliament next year, will have wide implications for the department responsible for dealing with anything from natural disasters, like flooding, to a terrorist attack.
The aim of the Civil Contingencies Bill is to give the police and the Government legal powers to deal with a terrorist strike or major disaster.
THE proposed Civil Contingencies Bill was supposed to modernise local emergency arrangements.
government is seeking greater authority to respond to emergencies and is pushing for that authority through the Civil Contingencies Bill.
During the House of Lords debate on the Civil Contingencies Bill, the Conservatives proposed a modest and balanced amendment to ensure that the Government could not override ``core rights'' such as the Habeas Corpus Act of 1816, and the Parliament Act of 1911.
Last November, the Government's Civil Contingencies Bill received Royal Assent.
The Civil Contingencies Bill became an Act of Parliament on 18th November 2004 and this requires all UK Authorities, the Emergency Services and N.
This government seems hell bent on creating a police state with the Civil Contingencies Bill.
Meanwhile, the expected Civil Contingencies Bill is reported to include measures to allow police to ban public gatherings, seize property,impose curfews and suspend the Human Rights Act in the wake of a ``big bang'' atrocity by terrorists.