citation

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citation

Informatics The record of an article, book, or other report in a bibliographic database that includes summary descriptive information–eg, authors, title, abstract, source and indexing terms. See Report.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sample References from Different Issues of D-Lib Magazine Showing the Lack of Standards in the Citation Style.
These items include Citation Style for Papers (41%), Incomplete Work Policy (40%), Make-Up Policy (34%), Accommodation of Disabilities (30%), Academic Dishonesty Policy (26%), and In-Class Behavior Expectations (16%).
25x9" pocket reference for undergraduate students is easy to navigate as well as handy to carry, with color coded sections, a detailed table of contents, indexes for each citation style covered (MLA, APA, Chicago), and a list of annotated sample papers with notes on which features and skills the papers demonstrate.
Typing errors are not infrequent, there is inconsistency (occasionally compounded by error) in citation style, and some strange typographical deficiencies, especially in chapter iii.
22) Oddly, the appellate rules do not mention the style manual, and counsel may follow any citation style or none at all.
While economics informs his thinking, Posner is hardly a one-trick pony: He has addressed topics as diverse as cloning, rhetoric, Kafka, citation style, AIDS, euthanasia, literary theory, advertising, and ancient Greece; it's almost easier to list subjects he hasn't discussed.
Combining Chicago style, American Medical Association (AMA) style, and American Psychological Association (APA) style, NEHA's citation style has, we know, caused some hand-wringing.
I have adopted the following citation style for all quotations of poetry: (volume [if applicable]: page number of cited edition, line numbers).
These bibliographic references should follow the citation style (Chicago Manual of Style) exemplified in these guidelines.
The first of these moves seems easy to defend; that a given Justice cites a Paper five times rather than once within an opinion may well say more about the idiosyncracies of citation style than it does about the Paper's substantive influence.
Compounding this issue is the lack of consistency among citation style guides, particularly regarding online information (Malone & Videon, 1997; Fletcher & Greenhill, 1995).