cinchona

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Related to Cinchona alkaloids: cinchona bark

cinchona

 [sin-ko´nah]
the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine, cinchonine, and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă),
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees (family Rubiaceae), native of South America but cultivated in various tropic regions. The cultivated bark contains 7-10% of total alkaloids; about 70% is quinine. Cinchona contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

/cin·cho·na/ (sin-ko´nah) the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.

cinchona

(sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′-)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes, some species of which are cultivated for their bark, which contains quinine and other alkaloids used chiefly to treat malaria.
2. The dried bark of any of these plants. Also called Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark.

cin·chon′ic (sĭng-kŏn′ĭk, sĭn-chŏn′-) adj.

cinchona

[singkō′nə, chinchō′nə]
Etymology: countess of Chinchon, Peru
the dried bark of the stem or root of species of Cinchona, containing the alkaloids quinine and quinidine.

cinchona

Herbal medicine
A tree native to South America, the primary source of the alkaloids, quinine and quinidine, which was the first effective antimalarial agent; other alkaloids present in cinchona include cinchonidine and cinchonine.
 
Toxicity
Abdominal pain, deafness, delirium, headache, impaired vision, nausea, psychotic disorder, tinnitus, vomiting and weakness.

Homeopathy
See China.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă)
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

A south American tree, genus Cinchona , from the bark of which quinine is derived.

cinchona (kin·chōˑ·n),

n Peruvian shrub, the bark of which is the source of quinine. Samuel Hahnemann repeatedly dosed himself with cinchona to examine its effects and realized that his symptoms paralleled those of malarial patients. This led to his development of his similia principle: “let likes be cured by likes.” Also called
quinine, china bark, or
china. See also quinine.