ciguatera

(redirected from Ciguatera fish poisoning)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

ciguatera

 [se″gwah-ta´rah]
a form of fish poisoning, marked by gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms due to ingestion of tropical or subtropical marine fish such as the barracuda, grouper, or snapper that have ciguatoxin in their tissues.

ci·gua·te·ra

(sē'gwă-tār'ă),
An acute toxic syndrome with predominantly gastrointestinal and neuromuscular features induced by ingestion of the flesh or viscera of various marine fish of the Caribbean and tropic Pacific reefs that contain ciguatoxin. The lipid-soluble, heat-stable toxin is produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, which is epiphytic on red and brown algae. Herbivorous fish foraging on reef algae consume the flagellates and are in turn consumed by carnivorous fish, the toxin becoming increasingly concentrated as it passes up the food chain. Some 400 species of fish have been associated with human intoxication. Symptoms come on 3-12 hours after exposure and include vomiting and diarrhea, myalgia, dysesthesia and paraesthesia of the extremities and perioral region, pruritus, headache, weakness, and diaphoresis. Toxic effects usually resolve spontaneously in about 1 week.
[Sp. fr. cigua, sea snail]

ciguatera

/ci·gua·te·ra/ (se″gwah-ta´rah) a form of ichthyosarcotoxism, marked by gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms due to ingestion of tropical or subtropical marine fish that have ciguatoxin in their tissues.

ciguatera

(sē′gwə-tĕr′ə)
n.
Poisoning caused by ingesting fish contaminated with ciguatoxin, characterized by gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms. Also called ciguatera fish poisoning, ciguatera poisoning.

ciguatera

[se′gwäta′rəh]
a form of fish poisoning, marked by GI and neurological symptoms, caused by ingestion of tropical or subtropical marine fish, such as the barracuda, grouper, or snapper that have accumulated ciguatoxin in their tissues. Ciguatoxin is heat resistant and is not detoxified by cooking. This form of poisoning is often misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis.

ciguatera

poisoning by consumption of the flesh or viscera of sporadically toxic tropical predatory fish of a wide range of species. The causative heat-stable toxins (ciguatoxin, maitotoxin and others) originate in the dinoflagellate (Gambierdiscus toxicus) and possibly others or from associated bacterial microflora. The toxins are subject to bioaccumulation in fish which eat the dinoflagellates, and subsequently in the predators. Growth of the dinoflagellates is promoted by the destruction of their coral reef habitat. Poisoning characterized by vomiting, diarrhea and paresis in cats, dogs, humans. See also lyngbya.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ciguatera fish poisoning and climate change: analysis of National Poison Center data in the United States, 2001-2011.
Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.
Ciguatera fish poisoning is endemic in temperate climates with reef systems.
Ciguatera fish poisoning is increasing in frequency, and travel to temperate coastal locales and the importation of reef-dwelling fish increase the exposure of humans to this illness.
From these, we selected the subset of calls where ciguatera fish poisoning was the sole substance code listed (n = 1,102).
Assessing the incidence of ciguatera fish poisoning with two surveys conducted in Culebra, Puerto Rico, during 2005 and 2006.
KEY WORDS: ciguatera, ciguatera fish poisoning, ciguatoxins, incidence, poisoning, Puerto Rico, seafood.
OBJECTIVES: We review and highlight inefficiencies in the reactive nature of existing HIS in the Pacific to collect, collate, and communicate ciguatera fish poisoning data currently used to inform public health intervention.
Likewise, each of these pathways may provide a means for potential therapeutic intervention of brevetoxin in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning and the more prolonged effects of related polyether ciguatoxin for ciguatera fish poisoning.
The link between regional outbreaks and ecosystem change is further illustrated by the periodic emergence of ciguatera fish poisoning.
Adverse health outcomes in humans range from acute neurotoxic disorders such as paralytic shellfish poisoning, neurotoxic shellfish poisoning, and ciguatera fish poisoning to more chronic diseases such as chronic liver disease caused by microcystins and amnesic shellfish poisoning from domoic acid exposure.
Like other diseases caused by algal toxins, ciguatera fish poisoning is underreported.