chicory

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Related to Cichorium: Cichorium endivia

chicory

a perennial herb found in the United States, India, and Egypt.
uses It is used as a coffee substitute, as a source of fructooligosaccharides, as a mild laxative for children, and as a treatment for gout, rheumatism, loss of appetite, and digestive distress. It is generally recognized as safe in foods and may be effective as an appetite stimulant; there is insufficient reliable information for its other indications.
contraindications It is contraindicated during pregnancy and lactation and in children. People who are hypersensitive to chicory or asteraceae/composit herbs also should avoid its use, and it is contraindicated for people with gallstones.

chicory

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb which contains fructose, inulin, lactucin, taraxasterol, pectin, resin, taraxasterol and tannins. It is diuretic, laxative and tonic; it is used topically for skin inflammation, and internally for diabetes, gallstones, gout, hepatitis and other liver conditions, rheumatic complaints, splenomegaly and caffeine-induced tachyarrhythmias.

chicory,

n Latin name:
Cichorium intybus; parts used: leaves, roots; uses: diuretic, laxative, sedative, appetite inducer, cancer; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, patients with heart disease or gallstones; can cause contact dermatitis. Also called
blue sailors, garden endive, succory, or
wild succory.

chicory

References in periodicals archive ?
The diuretic effect of Terminalia arjuna and anti-inflammatory and anti-immunotoxicity effect of Cichorium intybus have been shown in clinical and experimental studies (Kim 2002, Langmead 2001, Mathur 1994).
Preparation of PartySmart: PartySmart contains dried aqueous extracts of Phoenix dactylifera (fruit : 188 mg), Cichorium intybus (seeds : 188 mg), Andrographis paniculata (aerial part : 188 mg), Vitis vinifera (fruit : 188 mg), Phyllanthus amarus (aerial part : 124 mg), and Emblica officinalis (fruit : 124 mg).
INCI (matte): Water, butylene glycol, cichorium intybus (chicory) root extract, gymnema sylvestre leaf extract.
Only a limited number, including Cichorium intybus, Medicago sativa (planted), Phleum pratense, and Symphyotrichum novae-angliae were common to abundant.
Paronychia argenta, Plantago coronopus and Polygonum equisetiforme; Digestive system: Ricinus communis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Ficus carica and Foeniculum vulgare; Stomach: Paronychia argenta, Cichorium endivia and Lycium schweinfurthii; Inflammation: Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Malva parviflora; Tooth: Tamarix nilotica and Plantago coronopus; Kidney stones: Urtica sp.
In the present study, the efficacy of herbal medicine Liv-52 (consisting of Mandur basma, Tamarix gallica and herbal extracts of Capparis spinosa, Cichorium intybus, Solanum nigrum, Terminalia arjuna and Achillea millefolium) on liver cirrhosis outcomes was compared with the placebo for 6 months in 36 cirrhotic patients referred to Tehran Hepatic Center.
Types of weed in farms are: Chenopodium album, Amaranthus retroflexus, Portulaca oleraceae,Convolvulus arvensis, Echinochloa crus-gali, Kochia sp ,Solanum nigrum, Cichorium intybus, Acroptilon repens and etc.
Barbarea vulgaris, Cichorium intybus, Daucus carota, Draba verna, Erigeron annuus, Leucanthemum vulgare, Oenothera biennis, Pastinaca sativa, Penstemon digitalis, Solidago spp.
retroflexus, Arctium minus, Arenaria serpyllifolia, Barbarea vulgaris, Brassica nigra, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Centaurea mnaculosa, Cerastium vulgatum, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, Cichorium intybus, Cirsium arvense, Conium maculatum, Convolvulus arvensis, Datura stramonium, Daucus carota, Dianthus armeria, Dipsacus sylvestris, Draba verna, Froelichia gracilis, Geranium pusillum, Glechoma hederacea, grasses [Bromus commutatus, Bromus inermis Bromus japonicus, Bromus racemosa, Bronus tectorum, Dactylis glomerata, Digitaria ischaemum, Eleusine indica, Elytrigia repens, Eragrostis cilianensis, Lolium perenne var.
vulgatum, Cichorium intybus, Daucus carota, Lepidium campestre, Silene latifolia, Medicago lupulina, Plantago lanceolata, P.