agrimony

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agrimony

an herb found in Asia, Europe, and the United States.
uses Agrimony is used for mild diarrhea, gastroenteritis, intestinal secretion of mucus, inflammation of the mouth and throat, cuts and scrapes, and amenorrhea. There is insufficient reliable information to assess its effectiveness.
contraindications Agrimony is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to it or to roses.

Agrimony

An herb with a high content of tannin; it is anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, astringent, haemostatic, and is a GI tonic. It is used for athlete’s foot, diarrhoea, gastric ulcers, colitis, gallstones, cirrhosis, renal disease, and to decrease uric acid levels in gout.
Note: There are no peer-reviewed data regarding efficacy or safe or effective dose; its safety and efficacy in pregnancy is unknown. It can cause photodermatitis.

ag·ri·mo·ny

(ag'ri-mō-nē)
A perennial herb (Agrimonia eupatoria, A. herba) used in desiccated form in tablets and infusions, as well as topically (wound healing, astringent).
Synonym(s): cocklebur (1) , sticklewort.
[L. agrimonia, fr. G. argemōnē]

agrimony,

n Latin names:
Agrimonia eupatoria, Agrimonia pilosa var.,
Agrimonia japonica; parts used: stems, leaves, buds; uses: hemostatic, sore throat, cuts, abrasions, cancer, (other claims: antiasthmatic, antiinflammatory, sedative, decongestant, diuretic); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, can cause flushing, palpitations, rash, photosensitivity, and photodermatitis. Also called
church steeples, cocklebur,
langyacao, liverwort, longyacao, philanthropos, potter's piletabs, sticklewort, or
stickwort.
Enlarge picture
Agrimony.
References in periodicals archive ?
New towers can be built into their environment, many times enclosed inside a church steeple or disguised in other ingenuous ways.
Millions of people carry mobile phones with them everywhere they go,and there are thousands of mobile phone masts scattered around our beautiful landscape,not to mention the thousands of mobile phone antennae hidden in church steeples, petrol station signs,burger bar signs, telegraph poles and any tall building.
The whole valley of the river was inundated with only patches of high ground and the tops of trees and church steeples showing above the flood.
Churches, prevalent in residential areas, have become favorite targets, with antennas disguised as giant crosses and attached to - or hidden in - church steeples.
Tryco has obtained the rights to install and operate Wireless phone and Internet antennas, transmitters, servers and telecommunication systems in more than 2,800 church steeples throughout cities in Europe.
Moderate damage was reported in Oaxaca City, the state capital, where church steeples and many homes collapsed.
Historic buildings were ripped in half, homes were flattened and church steeples brought down by the worst tremor to hit Italy since nearly 300 died in 2009.
Bill and his dad often attracted the attention of local press as they painted and restored historic New England church steeples.
To improve cellular sound quality, phone companies over the past decade have installed hundreds of so-called stealth antennas, many times camouflaging them as palm trees or church steeples to better fit the surroundings.
One man who lives outside the town said he drove in after the storm and "the things that I used to see, the (grain) elevator, the church steeples, were gone.
Companies already use existing telephone poles and even church steeples to put up their equipment, he said.
Companies such as Pacific Bell Mobile Services hide transceiver stations in artificial palm or pine trees, on fake telephone or street-light poles, even on church steeples and high rooftops.