Chryseobacterium

Chryseobacterium

(kris″ē-ō-bak-tēr′ē-ŭm) [Gr. chryseos, chryous, golden + bacterium]
A genus of nonfermentative, glucose-oxidizing, yellow gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria. Some species cause opportunistic infections in severely immunosuppressed people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen.
Fatal case of community-acquired bacteremia and necrotizing fasciitis caused by Chryseobacterium meningosepticum: Case report and review of the literature.
Cytophaga, Flavobacterium, Flexibacter and Chryseobacterium infections in cultured marine fish.
The bacteria - Chryseobacterium and Paenisporosarcina - showed signs of respiration in laboratory-made ice designed to closely simulate the temperatures and nutrient content found at the bottom of Arctic and Antarctic glaciers.
2006) isolated and identified the following Gram-negative bacteria from Atlantic cod, which are not normally isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of fish: Acinetobacter johnsoni, Chryseobacterium spp.
Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, Chryseobacterium, Moraxella and other nonfermentative gram-negative rods.
Acinetobactor, Achromobacter, Chryseobacterium, Moraxella, and other nonfermentative gram-negative rods.
aureus 1 (3,3) Enterococcus raffinosus 1 (3,3) Klebsiella pneumonia 1 (3,3) Chryseobacterium indologenes 1 (3,3) Salmonella enteritidis 1 (3,3) KNS: Koagulaz negatif stafilokoklar Tablo 5.
One Chryseobacterium species produces a protein that blocks ice-crystal growth, a handy substance to have in such an environment.
To analyze the carbohydrate contents in human pro-ANP, pro-BNP, and pro-CNP, we carried out glycosidase digestion experiments using deglycosylation enzymes including PNGase F from Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, recombinant [alpha[-2(3,6,8,9) neuraminidase (also called sialidase A) from Arthrobacter ureafaciens, and recombinant O-glycosidase from Streptococcus pneumonia (Prozyme).
For tissues, disease transmission reports are less frequent but include transmission of HCV, Group A streptococcus, Clostridium spp, and Chryseobacterium.