chromatid

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Related to Chromatids: Sister chromatids

chromatid

 [kro´mah-tid]
either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere that make up a chromosome and that divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid),
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

/chro·ma·tid/ (kro´mah-tid) either of two parallel, spiral filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome.

chromatid

(krō′mə-tĭd)
n.
Either of the two daughter strands of a replicated chromosome that are joined by a single centromere and separate during cell division to become individual chromosomes.

chromatid

[krō′mətid]
Etymology: Gk, chroma, color
one of the two identical, threadlike filaments of a chromosome. Chromatids are produced by the self-replication of the chromosome during interphase and are held together by a common centromere. During anaphase of mitosis and meiosis II, the chromatids separate to become daughter chromosomes.

chro·ma·tid

(krō'mă-tid)
Each of the two strands formed by longitudinal duplication of a chromosome that becomes visible during prophase of mitosis or meiosis; the two chromatids are joined by the still undivided centromere; after the centromere has divided at metaphase and the two chromatids have separated, each chromatid becomes a chromosome.
[G. chrōma, color, + -id (2),]

chromatid

One of the two duplicated copies of a chromosome produced by replication while still connected at the CENTROMERE before separation at the subsequent cell division. Each chromatid becomes a new chromosome.
Chromatidclick for a larger image
Fig. 102 Chromatid . (a) Before duplication. (b) After duplication.

chromatid

one of a pair of duplicated CHROMOSOMES produced during the ‘S’ phase of the CELL CYCLE, which are joined together at the CENTROMERE. See Fig. 102 . During nuclear division the centromere splits (in anaphase of mitosis, anaphase 2 of MEIOSIS) to produce two separate chromosomes.

chromatid

either of two parallel filaments joined at the centromere which make up a chromosome, and which divide in cell division, each going to a different pole of the dividing cell and each becoming a chromosome of one of the two daughter cells.

sister chromatid
a chromatid formed by a replicating chromosome during interphase; because they are derived from the one homolog and joined at the center they are exact copies of each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
pole after the first meiotic division; and 4) Chromatids must separate
During the first stage of meiosis, the protein shows up initially where the sister chromatids join and then disappears from the centromeres during the second stage, right before the sisters break apart.
SCEs are a consequence of the interchange of replicating DNA between chromatids at apparently homologous loci.
The sister chromatid exchange average was taken from an analysis of 50 metaphases.
The appearance of a chromosome-type break, where two sister chromatids are broken at the same site, might be attributable to failure of HR to complete DSB repair, leading to the occurrence of a DSB in the other intact sister chromatid during the condensation of chromosome towards the M phase (Sonoda et al.
Prior to lining up at the metaphase plate, the members of each model pair can exchange one sock, resulting in the representation of a homologous pair of duplicated chromosomes containing a total of four unique chromatids.
New Giemsa method for the differential staining of sister chromatids.
Localization of heteromorphisms of FISH-rDNA between homologue chromosomes and between sister chromatids, and the presence of interstitial hybridization signals was found in metacentric and onto submetacentric chromosomes.
Nordenskjoeld M, Lambert B (1984) Gossypol induces DNA strand breaks in human fibroblasts and sister chromatids exchanges in human lymphocytes in vitro.
the reciprocal exchange of parts of the chromatids of the homologous chromosomes - can take place, and it ensures that bivalents are formed from the homologous parental chromosomes and are held together by chiasmata until first meiotic division.
Live studies reveal that acentric chromatids segregate efficiently to opposite poles.