chlorophyll

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chlorophyll

 [klor´o-fil]
any of a group of green pigments, containing a magnesium-porphyrin complex, that are involved in oxygen-producing photosynthesis. Preparations of water-soluble chlorophyll derivatives are sometimes applied topically for deodorization purposes. They may also be administered orally to deodorize ulcerative lesions as well as urine and feces in colostomy, ileostomy, or incontinence.

chlor·o·phyll

(klōr'ō-fil),
The magnesium complex of the phorbin derivative found in photosynthetic organisms; light-absorbing green plant pigments that, in living plants, convert light energy into oxidizing and reducing power, thus fixing CO2 and evolving O2; the naturally occurring forms are chlorophyll a, b, c, and d.
See also: phorbin.

chlorophyll

/chlo·ro·phyll/ (klor´o-fil) any of a group of green magnesium-containing porphyrin derivatives occurring in all photosynthetic organisms; they convert light energy to reducing potential for the reduction of CO2. Preparations of water-soluble chlorophyll salts are used as deodorizers; see chlorophyllin.

chlorophyll

(klôr′ə-fĭl)
n.
Any of a group of green pigments that capture light energy used as the energy source in photosynthesis and that are found in the chloroplasts of plants and other photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, especially:
a. A waxy blue-black microcrystalline green-plant pigment, C55H72MgN4O5, with a characteristic blue-green alcohol solution. Also called chlorophyll a.
b. A similar green-plant pigment, C55H70MgN4O6, having a brilliant green alcohol solution. Also called chlorophyll b.

chlo′ro·phyl′lous adj.

chlorophyll

[klôr′əfil]
Etymology: Gk, chloros + phyllon, leaf
one of several pigments that absorb light energy and participate in the production of carbohydrates in photosynthetic organisms. Chlorophylls a and b are found in plants, chlorophyll c occurs in brown algae, and chlorophyll d occurs in red algae. Chlorophyll molecules contain a porphyrin ring system that binds a central magnesium ion. See also photosynthesis.

chlorophyll

Biology
The green plant pigment pivotal in photosynthesis, the manufacture of carbohydrates from CO2 and H2O.

Fringe nutrition
While chlorophyll resembles haemoglobin chemically, it has no role in human metabolism; there is, therefore, no basis for using chlorophyll to treat allergies, anaemia, arthritis, colitis, coughs, hypertension, infections, ulcers, and many other conditions, as has been recommended by some alternative medical practitioners.

chlor·o·phyll

(klōr'ō-fil)
A complex of light-absorbing green pigments that, in living plants, convert light energy into oxidizing and reducing power, thus fixing CO2 and evolving O2; the naturally occurring forms are chlorophyll a, b, c, and d.

chlorophyll

a group of pigments giving a green coloration to most plants, which is found in any part of the plant that is exposed to sunlight. The pigments are usually contained in cell organelles called CHLOROPLASTS. Chlorophyll is a PORPHYRIN containing magnesium and exists in several forms which have different side chains. Typically, chlorophylls a (blue-green) and b (yellow-green) are found in higher plants; chlorophylls c and d are found in algae. Chlorophyll has the vital function of absorbing light energy for PHOTOSYNTHESIS. see ACTION SPECTRUM. A related pigment, BACTERIOCHLOROPHYLL, containing manganese instead of magnesium, is found in photosynthetic bacteria.

chlorophyll (klōˑ·rō·fil),

n a nontoxic plant pigment used in the treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease, to promote production of erythrocytes and hemoglobin, and to facilitate tissue regeneration. Used by plants to make energy from sunlight.
Enlarge picture
Chlorophyll.

chlor·o·phyll

(klōr'ō-fil)
Light-absorbing green plant pigments that, in living plants, convert light energy into oxidizing and reducing power, thus fixing CO2 and evolving O2.

chlorophyll (klôr´ōfil),

n the pigment required for photosynthesis in plants.

chlorophyll

any of a group of green pigments, containing a magnesium-porphyrin complex, that are involved in oxygen-producing photosynthesis in plants. Preparations of water-soluble chlorophyll derivatives are applied topically for deodorization of skin lesions and to stimulate healing. It is also administered orally to deodorize ulcerative lesions and the urine and feces.
A chlorophyll metabolite, phylloerythrin, is the common photodynamic agent in pastured animals with liver damage. The phylloerythrin accumulates because its excretory pathway is the biliary system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Azolla, chlorophyll, anthocyanin, carotenoids, seasonal variations
Drought is detrimental to the plants because it causes oxidation and producing a high amount of reactive oxygen species such as Anion super oxide, Radical hydroxyl, and Hydrogen peroxide which cause chlorophyll breakdown in chloroplast and disappearance of thylacoid membranes which finally disrupt photosynthesis process.
A new kind of chlorophyll that catches sunlight from just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum has been discovered, extending the known range of light that is usable by most photosynthetic organisms.
The equations described by Wellburn (1994) were used for the quantification of chlorophylls a and b, the total chlorophyll content and carotenoids.
However the chlorophyll a and protein content was high in blue light but the phycobilipigment was high under red light reflecting the necessity of high wavelength for the Phycobilin pigment synthesis especially PC and APC.
The researchers still have to determine how the light antennae of modified Spirulina chlorophylls work in practice.
During determination of the total chlorophyll contents of the samples, all the chlorophyll extraction works should preformed in the dim light environment and sometimes the test tubes that contain the chlorophyll extraction were covered with the aluminum foils in order to minimize the degradation and isomerization of chlorophylls.
two students as the two chlorophyll a molecules in the PSII reaction center
Payne (1976) performed AGP tests during the winter on several Indiana lakes and found that high AGP values obtained during that season were followed by high chlorophyll a, low Secchi depth, and high phytoplankton dry weight values in the field the next spring.
In the laboratory we identified the content of chlorophyll a and b, carotinoids in the leaves of woody plants by spectrophotometer method (spectrophotometer [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Russia) in acetone extracts (the absorption is 662, 644 and 440.