ethyl chloride

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eth·yl chlo·ride

a volatile explosive liquid (under increased pressure); when sprayed on the skin, produces local anesthesia by superficial freezing, but also is a potent inhalation anesthetic.
Synonym(s): chloroethane

ethyl chloride

[eth′il]
a topical anesthetic used in short operations.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of skin irritations and in minor skin surgery; the skin is sprayed until the surface turns white with frost.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is not used on broken skin or on mucous membrane.
adverse effects Among the more serious adverse effects are pain, muscle spasm, and, as a result of excessive use, frostbite.
note It is highly flammable.

eth·yl chlo·ride

(ethil klōrīd)
Volatile explosive liquid (under increased pressure); when sprayed on the skin, produces local anesthesia by superficial freezing, but also is a potent inhalation anesthetic.

ethyl chloride

A volatile liquid sometimes used as a spray to achieve local anaesthesia of the skin by freezing. It has also been used an a general anaesthetic, by inhalation, but is dangerously potent.

ethyl chloride

volatile, rapidly evaporating compound causing deep topical cooling (and thus temporary anaesthesia) when sprayed on skin, to allow treatment of small painful skin lesions, e.g. removal of nail spike

eth·yl chlo·ride

(ethil klōrīd)
Volatile explosive liquid; when sprayed on skin, produces local anesthesia by superficial freezing but also is a potent inhalation anesthetic.

ethyl chloride (eth´il klôr´īd),

n (C2H5Cl) a colorless liquid that boils between 12° and 13° C. It acts as a local, topical anesthetic of short duration through the superficial freezing produced by its rapid vaporization from the skin. Ethyl chloride is used occasionally in inhalation therapy as a rapid, fleeting general anesthetic, comparable to nitrous oxide but somewhat more dangerous.

ethyl

the monovalent radical, C2H5.

ethyl alcohol
see ethyl alcohol; called also ethanol and grain alcohol.
ethyl aminobenzoate
ethyl carbamate
ethyl chloride
a local anesthetic applied topically to intact skin. It has a very low boiling point and the skin is temporarily frozen and insensitive to pain.
ethyl lactate
an antibacterial agent used in shampoos.