firewall

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fire·wall

(fīr'wawl)
1. A special building material that is placed in walls between buildings or rooms to prevent the spread of fire.
2. A software program designed to prevent unauthorized persons from accessing a computer system.

firewall

A set of programs that protects the resources of a private computer network from users of other networks. It screens the messages that attempt to enter or leave the network and permits or denies access to outside users based on pre-programmed rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Please see Chinese wall policy [26], Static Separation of Duty (SSoD) and Cardinality Constraints in RBAC [7][27] for detail.
These arrangements were referred to in Prince Jefri Bolkiah [1999] 2 AC 222, 238-9 (Lord Millett): 'In my opinion an effective Chinese wall needs to be an established part of the organisational structure of the firm, not created ad hoc and dependent on the acceptance of evidence sworn for the purposes by members of staff engaged on the relevant work.
KPMG accepted this undertaking without informing Prince Jefri or obtaining his consent, and it set up what it contended was an adequate Chinese wall to prevent persons with knowledge of the work done for him from those assigned to the Brunei government's investigation.
The manufacturing corporation is unwilling to allow the securities firm to divulge the situation, and a Chinese wall at the securities firm prevents the investment bankers from passing the information to the registered reps.
If this turns out to be an issue, Google can conceivably be required to set up a Chinese wall between its search engine team and employees of other services.
Her Chinese Wall, a daughter of first-season sire Aussie Rules and an easy winner of a Listed race at Deauville last month, takes her chance today.
Such outcomes suggested the Chinese wall still stood.
All too often, he added, European businesses "meet a Chinese wall rather than an open door".
Holes develop in Chinese Wall preventing analyst conflicts," read a headline (Financial Advisor Magazine, August, 2001).
The introduction in chapter 1 contains a helpful description of several meanings of `conflict of interest', defining the following terms used throughout the book: existing client conflict, former client conflict, personal conflict, commercial conflict, judicial conflict, and Chinese Wall.
The essay by Borges I intended to discuss in class this morning is frightfully prophetic: the same emperor, Shih Huang Ti, who built the Chinese Wall also ordered all the books that preceded him to be burned.
At the time, he said he would bring down the Chinese wall between editorial and business, with "a bazooka if necessary.
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