China

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China

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy from cinchona (Peruvian bark) used for fatigue due to decreased body fluids, breast feeding, GI complaints, mental outbursts, gallbladder disease, headaches, insomnia, muscle fatigue, spasms, poor concentration, seizures and vertigo.
References in classic literature ?
As he did so his eyes fell on the Princess of China.
It would take on board the furs collected during the preceding year, carry them to Canton, invest the proceeds in the rich merchandise of China, and return thus freighted to New York.
They began walking through the country of the china people, and the first thing they came to was a china milkmaid milking a china cow.
What they had failed to take into account was this: that between them and China was no common psychological speech.
Assisted by a library ladder which stood against the book-case, I looked next into the two china bowls.
Then she wandered into another room and touched a china lamb, thinking it might be one of the children she sought.
The empire of Japan no longer exists, having been conquered and absorbed by China over a hundred years ago.
A cloth was laid on a round table, and on it stood a china tea service and a silver spirit-lamp and tea kettle.
Crisparkle during the last re-matching of the china ornaments (in other words during her last annual visit to her sister), after a public occasion of a philanthropic nature, when certain devoted orphans of tender years had been glutted with plum buns, and plump bumptiousness.
MacWhirr satisfying these requirements, was continued in command of the Nan-Shan, and applied himself to the careful navigation of his ship in the China seas.
Being thus delivered from a danger which, though I knew not the reason of it, yet seemed to be much greater than I apprehended, I resolved that we should change our course, and not let any one know whither we were going; so we stood out to sea eastward, quite out of the course of all European ships, whether they were bound to China or anywhere else, within the commerce of the European nations.
One of the linen chests was open; the silver teapot was unwrapped from its many folds of paper, and the best china was laid out on the top of the closed linen-chest; spoons and skewers and ladles were spread in rows on the shelves; and the poor woman was shaking her head and weeping, with a bitter tension of the mouth, over the mark, "Elizabeth Dodson," on the corner of some tablecloths she held in her lap.